Alu Kabli

When I was young and still a school going child, my mom was very particular about my hygiene. She never used to let me have anything prepared on the streets, but that led me to break the rule and indulge having roadside food. Everyday when I used to comeback from school I used stop at the nearest chaat stall and had my share of alu kabli. Alu Kabli or alu chaat as they call it in most parts of India is very popular among all students, but to disclose the secret it tempts all. My mom used to scold me for having street junks, but I could never kill my temptation to have the small bowl full of alu chaat. School days have passed years ago, but I still can’t resist the smell and taste of alu chaat.

The tamarind paste and the green chilies mix to create an ecstatic smell of freshness, which I have never got from any dish I had. The spices make a brilliant hot and sour combination, and of course the potatoes and chickpeas add to the joy of having it. This evening when I was preparing the alu chaat, I am flown back to the stall just outside my school, and how I craved for the last bell to ring. I have had alu chaats in many different places, but still when I pass by that chaatwala I stop to commit the sin of having the same old alu chaat. Today my post is a tribute to the good times I spent with my friends in front of the chaat stall and the fear of getting caught by mom.

Serves: 4


Potato (Alu): 2 large sizes

Onion (Peyaj): 1 medium size

Roasted cumin powder (Jeera guro): 1 teaspoon

Red Chili Powder (Sukhno Lankar guro): 1 teaspoon

Green chili (Kacha Lanka): 2-3

Chickpea (Chana Dal): 1 tablespoon

Coriander leaves (Dhane pata) for garnishing

Salt to taste


  • Soak the chickpeas overnight, or for more than 6 to 7 hours.
  • Boil the potatoes without taking out the peel. Alternately you can also bake it in a microwave oven for 12 minutes.
  • After the potatoes are boiled properly, see to it that they are not over boiled, take out the peels and chop them into 1” length pieces
  • Chop the onions very finely, the chilies in small rings
  • Add all spices along with the onions, green chili and salt; mix well
  • Throw in the chickpeas and tamarind paste, toss it so that it gets evenly mixed
  • Garnish with coriander leaves and serve
Alu Kabli

Alu Kabli

Alu chaat is a favorite among all age groups. Serve it over an evening chit chatting. Look for more updates here, till then Happy Cooking and Happy Eating.

Sending this to Original Recipes – Monthly Round-Up Event.


Malabar Chicken

From my childhood I always wished where ever I am I should be at my home in Kolkata for the Durga Puja. We have a century old tradition of worshiping the deity. But, this time it’s a little different. I am away from home for the first time in my life during the Durga Pujas. I am missing every bit of this gorgeous festival.

If you are in Kolkata we’ll never be able to ignore the arrival of this festive season. With the start of September you can feel the Puja is nearing. All the markets and for now the shopping malls are flooded with people to buy new clothes, shoes, and house hold articles. As the big day nears, the foot paths are barricaded with bamboo pillars to control the heavy crowd. There are big hoardings of advertisements on every nook and corner of the city. With all these grandeur and pomp comes our idol. I miss those lazy afternoons sitting at my neighborhood Puja pandal chit chatting with my friends. All my relatives come to my place to worship the deity. O, I miss everything about Kolkata.

There is nothing more I can do but to think about the by gone days of living in Kolkata during the Durga Pujas. So, just to make myself a little happier than I am right now, I thought of adding some special recipes for this occassion.

Living in the Southern part of India, these days I come across a lot many South Indian cuisine. Every region in South India has got its own style of cooking. Malabar region is in the South-western part of India, facing the Arabian Sea. Lots of spices like cloves, coriander, cardamom, black pepper grow in the hilly terrain of the Malabar Coast. All their cuisine is done with these spices. The Malabar Chicken is just one such example of the rich cuisine of this coastal region.

Serves 2


Chicken (Murgi): 500gms

Onion paste (Peyaj bata): 2 tablespoons

Desiccated coconut (Narkel korano): ½ cup

Coriander leaves (Dhane pata): 1 tablespoon

Green chili paste (Kacha Lanka bata): 1 ½ tablespoon

Garlic-ginger paste (Ada-rasun bata): 1 tablespoon

Red chili powder (Sukhno Lanka guro): 1 teaspoon

Tamarind paste (Tetul bata): 1 tablespoon

Coriander powder (Dhane guro): 1 teaspoon

Clove (Labango): 5 to 6

Black pepper (Gol morich): 10 -12

Turmeric powder (Halud guro): 1 teaspoon

Sunflower oil (Sada tel): 1 tablespoon

Salt to taste


For preparing the tamarind paste:

  • Take out the pulp of 5 or 6 tamarind pods and dip in water for ½ an hour.
  • With a sieve separate the pulp from the tamarind water, and keep the tamarind water for later use.

For the curry:

  • Heat oil in a wok. Throw in the ginger-garlic paste, onion paste, black pepper, green chili paste and tamarind water, sauté for 2 minutes.
  • Add red chili, coriander and turmeric powder along with the desiccated coconut. Fry till the coconut turns brownish.
  • Add water and cook for 5 -7 minutes.
  • Add the chicken and add water till necessary.
  • Cook till the chicken becomes tender, adding water if required.
  • Garnish with coriander leaves.
Malabar Chicken Curry

Malabar Chicken Curry

Serve with just cooked rice and enjoy the taste of the Malabar chicken.

Sending this sensational side dish to Ruth’s Sensational Sides Event.

Also sending over to Aartee’s Sapadu Ready Event

Sending this recipe to Pallavi’s Yummy Festival Feast- Diwali.

Happy Cooking and Happy Eating.

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