Guest Post- Chilled Coconut and Melon Soup with Ginger

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Its been a long since we had a guest post on our blog. This post is from a very dear friend, Soma who blogs at eCurry. She had prepared this chilled and refreshing soup from the cantaloupe grown in her own backyard. Know ore about it in her own words:

The chilled soup is perfect for entertaining, incredibly refreshing and quite simple to make.

I have a feeling that we have left the gnarling sun and the summer heat behind us. The shriveled up grass has finally started to look green and when they are bathed in the morning sun, they are prettier than ever. This time of the year is actually the most beautiful time in Texas. The struggle with the sun has come to an end. We have had a few showers. The early morning hours are just breathtakingly beautiful, filled with shadows and the pink in the sky and if we are lucky, I can see the few lavender stalks swaying in the cool pleasant breeze. I usually wait to embrace this time with open arms. It is that time of the year when I draw energy from the dawn to make myself go through the day.

The little green patch at the back yard surprised us with a few cantaloupes when I had thought we had lost all the squash and melons to the nasty bugs. Tucked in one corner, I saw this one (and a couple more after this) hanging down from the fence!

Delights of life are in little things. The home grown cantaloupes are half the size of the store bought ones; just the perfect size to serve the four of us with no leftovers. A couple of years back when we had these tiny cantaloupes, we got obsessed with these fruit filled melon bowls. Every single cantaloupe was destined to be scooped out to make Melon Fruit Bowl.

And this year we are into to chilled soups and juice.

This summer soup is really easy to make. All you would need to do is blend everything together and chill. If you have been reading my recipes, you would know I have an obsession with ginger. It finds a place in almost every recipe in my kitchen, including many desserts, and this was no different. I love the way it immediately elevates the flavors with a zing.

Although the mixture keeps in the refrigerator for a couple of days, it’s best within a couple of hours of making it. And since everything comes together so quickly, it’s never much of a hassle to prepare right before a meal, which leaves it plenty of time to cool before you’re ready to eat. It is a lovely way to clean the palate after any meal.

Chilled Coconut and Melon Soup with a hint of Ginger

Dinner, Indian, Cantaloupe recipe, Chilled soup, Summer coolers
Cooks in    Serves 4
Ingredients
  • 2 cup ripe juicy melon (cantaloupe/honey dew or the kind; you may use combine different kinds), chopped
  • 3/4 – 1 cup light coconut milk
  • sugar/honey/agave nectar, to taste (you will need this if melons are not sweet enough. Omit if not needed)
  • 2 tablespoon fresh (or frozen) grated coconut
  • 1.5 teaspoon fresh lime juice, or to taste
  • fresh refreshing herbs like mint/lemon thyme/any kind you like
  • 1 teaspoon fresh ginger juice (grate fresh ginger and squeeze out the juice) or 1.5 tablespoon chopped candied ginger (adjust amount to taste)
  • ice cubes
  • a couple of tablespoon finely chopped melons to garnish
Directions
  • Combine ice, coconut milk, chopped melons (other than those for garnish), grated coconut, sweetener, ginger juice/candied ginger, lemon juice and some of the fresh herbs and blend until smooth.
  • If needed, chill the soup.
  • When ready to serve, divide in serving bowls, and garnish with chopped melons and more herbs.
  • Enjoy the summer!

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Pati Lebur Sarbet – Lemonade

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With the mercury rising every day and no sign of rain, this is the time of keeping yourself hydrated. The heat and the sweat makes your body loose lots and lots of water. Especially with children, its summer time and all they want is to play all day long. So, a little refreshing drink during the summer heat to get back your energy is the best way to chill this summer.

Fruits are also a great option to keep cool. Whether you like it in bite size pieces or pureed to a smooth juice, eat loads of fruits everyday. But, there are people who are allergic to fruits, mainly the citrus fruits like melons and oranges, try having a sip of the Bengali style lassi, the ghol.

But, my all time favourite is pati lebur sherbet, better known as lemonade. This easy to prepare drink is a healthy one. Lemon, though contains citric acid, reduces the body acidity and keeps indigestion at bay. This rich in vitamin C drink is very healthy for the summers, and it also reduces skin blemishes. There are many many other benefits of lemonade, and of course the taste of lemonade is just to die for. The lemonade recipe is a derivative of the Martha Stewart classic lemonade recipe.

Pati Lebur Sarbet - Lemonade

Indian, Drink, Lemonade, Summer cooler, Spring break kids diy, Bengali drink
Cooks in    Serves 8
Ingredients
  • 3 cups of lemon juice (about 20 lemons)
  • 2 cups of sugar
  • 1 cup lukewarm water
  • 3 cups cold water
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • Ice cubes (optional)
  • Lemon wedges (optional)
  • Mint sprigs (optional)
Directions
  • Pour in the sugar in the lukewarm water and bring to boil to dissolve the sugar, talk out of flame and let it cool down to normal temperature
  • In a tall jar pour in the sugar syrup, cold water and lemon juice and add the ice cubes if you are using
  • Serve immediately with more ice cubes, lemon wedges and mint sprigs or chill in the fridge for later use.

Hot Tips –If you don’t like to add too much of lemon juice, then use the authentic Bengali recipe. To a glass of cold water add 2 tablespoon of lemon juice, 1 teaspoon sugar and a pinch of salt, stir well and serve.

This lemonade recipe goes to Cool Summer Sip event hosted by Jyoti.

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Strawberry Lassi for the Spring Break

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While in Texas we are still having a nice sunless weather, am sure back in India people have started feeling the onset of summer. And, summer coolers are just the right thing to have after a daylong work outside.

A first look into Google this morning it showed a colourful doodle by Marimekko. Yes, it is the start of spring, and with spring the markets are getting flooded with berries – strawberries, blackberries, raspberries, blueberries – you name them and it’s there neatly arranged in the shelves for you to grab.

I love all sorts of berries, but of course strawberries are my favourite. So, as am busy setting up my new home in Austin, I started experimenting in the kitchen too. Lassi is my favourite summer drink and to mix it up with some strawberries – the combination can just never go wrong.

As the spring breaks are on, you can also ask your children to help you out with this preparation. Am sure they’ll enjoy making and having these tumble full of strawberry lassi.

Strawberry Lassi

Indian, Drink, Summer cooler, Spring break kids diy
Cooks in    Serves 2
Ingredients
  • 4 cups of plain yogurt
  • ½ cup chopped strawberries
  • ¼ cup granulated sugar
  • 5-6 ice cubes
  • 1 tablespoon whipped cream (optional)
Directions
  • • Put everything except the cream in a food processor and pulse till the entire mixture turns a pale pink color
  • • Pour in large glasses and serve with a whipped cream topping and/or more ice cubes
  • • Serve instantly

Hot Tips – You can prepare the lassi without the strawberry or any other fruits of choice. If you don’t want it to be too thick then pour in 3 cups of plain yogurt with 1 cup of cold water.

This strawberry yogurt drink goes to Cooking Concepts # 9 – Spring Seasonal Food, Ramya’s ABC Series: FRUIT FIESTA and also to Beat the Heat event.

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Tetor Dal

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Bitter gourd or what we call karolla/karela is one of those vegetables which even veggie lovers try to avoid. A somewhat smaller in shape is the ucche which is quite hard to find in Kolkata, leave aside somewhere outside India. These two cousins with their bitter taste, avoided by almost all have a niche in Bengali cuisine. During my childhood, summer lunch always meant a bowl of alu-karolla sedho (boiled potato and bitter gourd) drenched in mustard oil or even the dudh shukto. While most of my friends hated these preparations, I was and am in love with this bitter vegetable.

I was in Spencer’s yesterday, when I got hold of some fresh karolla and there I was holding a couple of bitter gourd thinking of what to prepare with it. The first thought was preparing some fried karola, but then left the idea because of the amount of oil that comes along with it. Shukto is my all-time favorite, but then raw papaya is quite hard to find in Bangalore. Do let me know if you are aware of any place where you get fresh green papaya in Bangalore.

After some thinking and peeping into my refrigerator, I thought of preparing the tetor dal (pulses with bitter gourd). Tetor dal is my mom’s specialty. I have never tasted such mouth-watering dal anywhere. And, after all no restaurant not even Oh! Calcutta or some Bengali specialty restaurant will serve tetor dal, whatsoever. So, here’s a beginner’s guide to preparing the karola, lau and jhinga diye dal (lentils with three different gourds).

Serves 4

Ingredients:

  • 200gms bitter gourd, cut into rings
  • 1 medium size ridge gourd/ jhinga, chopped into rings
  • ½ of a small gourd/ lau, cut to 1” size hemispherical pieces
  • 1 cup yellow lentil/ mung dal
  • 1 bay leaf
  • 2 green chili
  • ½ teaspoon turmeric powder
  • 1 teaspoon cumin seeds
  • ½ teaspoon cumin powder
  • 1 teaspoon ginger paste
  • 3 tablespoon mustard oil
  • Salt to taste

Preparation:

  • Wash the lentils and start boiling with 2 cups of water
  • As the lentils get half cooked, put in the ridge gourd and the gourd
  • Heat 2 tablespoons of mustard oil in a wok and fry the bitter gourd till half done
  • Add the fried karola to the boiling dal
  • Once the vegetables are completely cooked, add the turmeric, and cumin powder
  • Heat the extra oil in a deep bottom pan, throw in the bay leaf and cumin seeds
  • As the seeds start sputtering, pour in the dal and stir once
  • Keep over flame till the dal starts boiling
  • Take out of flame, add a dollop of ghee (optional) and serve hot with warm rice and fries.

Hot Tips – If you are an absolute hater of bitter gourd, then just give it a miss .

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Summer Coolers – Watermelon Mocktail

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The temperature rising high and its becoming tougher by the day to sustain this heat almost throughout India and of course in Texas. The global warming is taking its toll. Though its quite pleasant out here in Bangalore, I’m just worried about my loved ones in Kolkata – almost no rain and the temperature rising above 36 degree celsius almost everyday with the terrifying humidity.

The only way out is to have a loads and loads of fruits – chopped to bite sized pieces or blended to a refreshing juice. Mango and watermelon are the kings of summer. Wherever you go, you’ll definitely get hold of these two at least.

There was a big watermelon lying in my fridge for the last couple of days, and even though the maid chops it into small pieces, am still lazy enough to bite into each piece, separate those hundreds of seeds and savour it. So, thought of a better idea – why not to puree it to a refreshing drink. Here I am gulping on the watermelon juice and writing about it.

Ingredients:

  • 3 cups of chopped watermelon
  • 2 tablespoon sugar (optional)
  • Pinch of salt

Preparation:

  • Puree the watermelon and strain out the seeds
  • Serve with ice cubes in martini or whiskey glasses

Hot Tips- If you are planning to have this on a weekend, I suggest that you mix a little vodka with it and treat yourself with a watermelon martini.

Health Tips – If you worry about your health a little then watermelon is the best fruit to have. The nutritional fact for watermelon says that it consists of more than 90 percent of water and very less in fat. So, enjoy this summer with watermelons.

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Mango Salsa – No cooking recipe

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Saturdays are just great. There is no hurry anything on earth. The morning hour rush for office is still one more to go. Laziness prevails in everything – waking up at 11 in the morning, lunch at 3 in the afternoon, or probably even later and there comes the evening with friends, and of course there’s no rush to go early to bed. I love Saturdays. Even I give my cooking a break on Saturdays.

After watching two movies, 3 episodes of an English series, I was wondering what to do for the evening. The tummy was calling for some food, and so decided to make both my tummy and tongue happy- what better way than to have some ripe orange mangoes during this summer evening. There were some veggies left in the kitchen, so just tossed them together to have a tangy mango salsa for the evening.

Ingredients:

  • 200 gms chopped mangoes (preferably fresh, canned ones will also do)
  • ½ green bell pepper
  • 1 green chili
  • 1 tablespoon of chopped cilantro
  • ¼ red tomatoes, chopped
  • ½ teaspoon chili flakes
  • ½ teaspoon salad seasoning (optional)
  • ½ teaspoon lime juice (optional)

Preparation:

  • Toss all the fruits and vegetables together
  • Season with chili flakes, salad seasoning and a pinch of salt if you like and pour in the lime juice on top

 

Hot Tips – You can put in some onions and green peas if you want

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Butterscotch Mango Sundae

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The temperature rising high and there is nothing you can do about it – the scorching sun and the sweat dripping down your nape. Can you think of any solution?  Of course visiting a cool hill station is one way out, but a cheaper solution may be having a good, cold, long sundae.

A little googling about sundae gave me more than 10 million links to sundae. Google celebrated the 119th birthday of sundaes with a Google doodle, allegedly invented first by someone in Ithaca, N.Y, who also happens to be a pharmacist.

Whether or not it’s someone from USA or from Uruguay, sundaes are everyone’s favorite, and for those who are calorie conscious, why not just indulge in some sin – sundaes on Sunday.

Serves 2
Preparation time 5min

Ingredients:

  • 400gms butterscotch ice cream
  • 1 ripe mango
  • 6 chocolate wafers
  • Cherries for garnishing

Preparation:

  • Crush 4 wafers into small bits
  • Slice the mango into very small pieces
  • Take two wine flutes fill with 2 tablespoons of chocolate wafers and 3 tablespoons of mango slices
  • Put in 1 big scoop of ice-cream
  • Layer similarly till you reach the top of the glass; add one last scoop of ice cream
  • Garnish with cherries and wafers
  • Serve immediately

Hot Tips – If you don’t want to buy the ice-cream, here’s how you can prepare butterscotch ice-cream

Don’t forget to participate in the Father’s Day event happening at Cook Like a Bong. The last date of submission of all your entries is 15th June, 2011. You can send as many entries as you want . Send in your dad’s favorite recipes, your stories about your father, and any gift ideas for the day, or just send a photo of yours with your father – we’ll publish here on Father’s Day.

And, for the Father’s loving child there will be a surprise gift announced for the best entry. So, send your entries quickly and enroll yourself to get a great gift from Cook Like a Bong.

 

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Dhaka Style Doi Bhaat/ Curd Rice

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My grandparents hail from Chittagong (my paternal granddad) and Barishal (my maternal granddad). They both have shifted to Kolkata during partition. But, both the families could never give off the style of cooking, that’s the Bangal style of cooking food. My mom, who learnt how to cook from her mom, has passed on her culinary skills (at least a portion) to me. So, whenever I cook, whatever I cook – the influence of Bangladesh is always there – be it the Chittagong special begun marichut or the lau khosha chhechki from Barishal or even the Mexican style fried rice, which I couldn’t keep out without the Bengali twist.

Even though Bangladesh seems to be very small country in the world map, the cuisine is diverse. Every state you visit in Bangladesh has a different style of cooking. A simple potato curry will taste different when you travel from Dhaka to Kumilla.

So, when Chandrima Guha posted a photo of Dhaka style doi bhaat, I just couldn’t help myself but request her to have it as a guest post in Cook Like a Bong. Dhaka cuisine is special for the non-vegetarian dishes from chicken to fish and from beef to lamb – cooked in rich spicy gravy. Chandrima says, she has learnt cooking from her mom, grand mom, mom-in-law & aunt-in-law. Of the many hundreds of popular non-vegetarian dishes so popular, this not so popular yet century old simple vegetarian dish from Dhaka is sure to steal the show. The Dhaka style Doi Bhaat, Chandrima learnt from her granny. This no spicy pulao is much different from the South Indian curd rice. This vegan rice is cooked with kalonji (nigella/ kalo jeera) with the flavoring agent as gondhoraj lebu.

Though the smell of gondhoraj can’t be replaced, as Anjan Chatterjee, author of Mainland China Cook Book and the owner of Specialty Group of restaurants mentions in “Scent of Lime’, searching for the root of gondhoraj, but for those of you who have days to go before you reach the shores of Bengal, you can use Khafir lime or Thai lime in place of gondhoraj lebu.

Ingredients:

  • 500 gram Gobindobhog atop chaal
  • 3 big Gondhoraj lebu,
  • 10 Gondhoraj lebu leaves(optional)
  • 4 green chilies
  • 2 teaspoon sugar (optional)
  • 2 tablespoon yoghurt
  • 2 tablespoon refined oil or ghee
  • Finely chopped coriander leaves
  • ½  teaspoon nigella
  • Salt to taste

Preparation:

  • Cook rice, spread on a flat utensil & cool it.
  • Mix yoghurt, sugar, salt, 2 chilies, Gondhoraj lebu juice, Gondhoraj lebu pieces (squeezed pieces) and gondhoraj lebu leaves (if available) with rice.
  • Keep aside for at least an hour.
  • Take out gondhoraj lebu pieces & leaves from rice just before cooking.
  • Heat oil or ghee in a wok or non-stick pan.
  • Add nigella & 2 green chilies.
  • Mix the rice & fry for 10 minutes on medium flame.
  • Sprinkle 1 teaspoon ghee(if cooked in oil) & coriander leaves.
  • Take out from flame & serve hot.

Hot Tips – Both lime and yogurt is very good for keeping yourself cool during the summer heat.

Don’t forget to participate in the Father’s Day event happening at Cook Like a Bong. The last date of submission of all your entries is 15th June, 2011. You can send as many entries as you want . Send in your dad’s favorite recipes, your stories about your father, and any gift ideas for the day, or just send a photo of yours with your father – we’ll publish here on Father’s Day.

And, for the Father’s loving child there will be a surprise gift announced for the best entry. So, send your entries quickly and enroll yourself to get a great gift from Cook Like a Bong.

 

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Beverages your Bengali taste buds would savor

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Hope you all have made plans for welcoming the New Year, and not to forget a whole new decade. Our journey at Cook Like a Bong started 3 years back. We like to thank all our readers for their wonderful support through out. We hope that we’ll receive more readers and more Bong food lovers and foodies in the years to come. To end with a post for this year, here’s a guest post from Joy Paley.

Joy Paley is a science, technology, and health writer from Berkeley, California. When she’s not reading about the latest medical research, you can find her doing yoga, cooking, or working on a crafty project. She is a guest blogger for My Dog Ate My Blog and writes on online degrees for Guide to Online Schools.

Best of Bengali Beverages

The Bengal region of India offers some seriously delicious smoothies, iced, and hot drinks. These can be a great pick-me-up between meals, or an interesting and sophisticated offering at your next party. The best part? These treats are chock full of nutrients that make them both healthful and tasty.

Papaya Shakes

These are great because their ingredients are so simple: they’re usually just a blend of papaya, mint, and water, with some lemon and honey for flavor. In some places you can find them with a little spice, courtesy of black pepper powder. And, papayas are rich in antioxidants that help fight free radicals, which can cause cancer and make you age faster. Papayas are also full of potassium, fiber, and folate.

Photo Courtesy – Nithya of 4th Sense Cooking

Watermelon Juice

It’s hard to find a good version of this juice in the store, but it’s easy to prepare at home. All you need is a ripe watermelon and a juicer. Make your watermelon juice, add a little mint juice, lemon juice, sugar, and mint leaves for garnish. Wait until it’s ice cold to drink. Watermelon is high in vitamin C and vitamin A, and low in calories.

Jaljeera

This spiced drink is probably something you haven’t tried before, unless you’re familiar with Bengali beverages. It’s made by adding cumin powder, sugar, salt, chat masala, and lemon juice to water, and chilling in the refrigerator. Cumin is a cancer-preventing antioxidant that also helps detoxify the liver.

Photo Courtesy – Sabah in Action

Hot Cocoa

The ingredients here are similar to hot cocoa you may have encountered before, but the preparation is different. Cocoa powder and salt are combined to form a paste, diluted with cold water, and boiled. Then milk and sugar are added. The result is a delicious way to stay warm. Plus, cocoa contains a wide array of polyphenols, a type of antioxidant compound that fights signs of aging in your skin and other organs.

Ginger Tea

You’ve probably got the essential ingredients to make this yummy tea already in your kitchen. It’s made by combining a crushed piece of ginger, aniseed, and tea leaves in boiling water. After boiling for a few minutes, you strain out the spices, and add sugar and milk to taste. Ginger is a great home remedy for joint and muscle pain, nausea, and rheumatoid arthritis.

Photo Courtesy – Thai Dessert

 
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Aamer Dal – Bengali Mango Dal Recipe

 

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ও শিব কবে হবে কাল, নিম দিয়ে ছেচকি আম দিয়ে ডাল

Kolkata has started observing the heat waves for this year. The temperature is going way above the 30°C. To beat the heat and keep the body cool having something bitter or sour is best. By definition though summer is a little away but the markets are flooded with raw mangoes. These sour tasting mangoes are a wonderful ingredient for varieties of Bengali recipes. Starting from the simple dal to chatni and even achar green mangoes are a favorite.

Enlightment

Enlightenment

The green mango dal is a must have in most Bengali families during the summer time. Green mango has some very good health benefits too. The raw mango contains more Vitamin C than the half-ripe or ripe mangoes. It also contains a good amount of Vitamin B1 and B2. To know more about the health benefits of raw mangoes have a look at this article “Eating Mango is Really Beneficial for Health”.

So, Beat the Heat with Raw Mango Daal (Bengali Mango Daal, aamer dal, mango dhal):

Preparation time: 10min

Cooking time: 15min
Serves 4

Aamer Dal - Bengali Mango Daal

Aamer Dal - Bengali Mango Daal

Ingredients:

  • Red Lentil (Masur dal): ½ cup
  • Split Husked Mung Bean (Mung/Moog dal): ½ cup
  • Raw Mango (Kancha aam): 1
  • Turmeric powder (Halud guro): ½ teaspoon
  • Mustard seeds (Sarse dana): 1 tablespoon
  • Mustard oil (Sarser tel): 2 tablespoon
  • Salt to taste

Preparation:

  • Mix the two lentils together and boil with 2 cups of water and salt
  • As the lentils get half cooked add the mango pieces and cook till the lentils are fully cooked
  • Add the turmeric powder and with a wired balloon whisk stir the cooked lentils once or twice
  • Heat the oil in a wok, throw in the mustard seeds and dried chilies
  • As the mustard seeds starts popping pour in the lentils and cook for a minute or two
  • Serve hot with rice for lunch

Further Reading: Chholar Daal, Dal Shukno, Masur Dal – Musurir Daal, Roadside Tadka

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Mishti Doi

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“De doi, de doi paate| ore beta haari haate||”

The above quote is from a poem I read long time back, but can’t exactly remember the poet now. It says, give me the sweet yogurt the one who carries the pot with him.

Mishti Doi

A few days back when I saw Dolon write about Mishti doi on her blog, the sweet greedy Bong awoke within me. Mishti doi reminds me, and probably all Bengalis an earthen pot filled with a brownish mass of sweet curd. Misti doi is an inseparable part of all festivals in Bengal- be that a tika (a dot on the forehead) for Bhai phota (festival to mark the well being of brother), or the charanamitro (offering made to God during worship), or just a dessert to end the meal for a feast.  While we were searching for links on Mishti doi, K found an interesting one. I never knew this; SJ prepared it in an oven. That is really a nice and quick way to prepare misti doi, I believe. The post even wrote about the mention of curds in Vedas as the “Food of God”, and probably that explains why it’s offered during all rituals.

I have tried out mishti dahi in Bangalore too, but here it’s sold in plastic containers. The smell of the wet earthen pot holding the misti doi gives the actual feel of this dessert. So, when I came back to Kolkata yesterday I just couldn’t wait to devour some misti doi. Earthen pots are easily available here, and mom had some handy in her kitchen, so that was not a problem at all. While the color of the yogurt helps all to remind them of this dessert, there are some sweet shops in Kolkata too where mishti dahi looks white similar to the set sour curd.

Mishti doi though a very popular dessert throughout Bengal, it is rarely prepared at home. This may probably because it’s readily available in the market (sweet shops in Bengal are more frequent than light posts on the streets) and also preparing it takes a long time almost over night and even more. So a time taking recipe, but still is worth all the labor. Here, it is all for you to grab.

Cooking time: 35min
Preparation time: 5min
Incubation: Overnight (10-11hr)
Makes half-litre of yogurt

Ingredients:

  • Full Cream Milk (Dudh): 1ltr
  • Sugar (Chini): 8 tablespoon
  • Yogurt (Dahi): 1 tablespoon
  • 1 Earthen pot (optional)

Preparation:

  • Pour the milk in a thick bottom vessel and start heating over low flame
  • As it starts boiling add 4 tablespoons of sugar and keep on simmering till the volume is reduced to little less than half
  • Take the remaining sugar with 2 tablespoons of water and heat till the sugar melts and attains a golden brown color
  • Gradually add the molten sugar over the milk and boil for another 15 minutes over low flame
  • Take out of flame and let it become lukewarm
  • Pour the milk over the earthen pot and add the yogurt
  • Keep the pot in a cool dry place, and let the yogurt set over night
  • Refrigerate the set dahi and serve as a dessert

Mishti Doi

Hot tips – Instead of using yogurt to set the dahi, freeze-dried bacteria can also be used for the same purpose.

Further readings – Bengali sweetsYogurt in ten steps, List of misti doi

Linda is celebrating the World Breast Feeding Week on her blog with the event Got Milk?. Mishti doi is on way to the event.

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