Malai Kulfi – Indian Spiced Ice Cream

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The Texas summer is in full swing now. The highest temperature for an average day is now above 100F, that would be almost 38C; yes the high school mathematics is of much help these days. Texas summers are hot and dry, and for me there is no chance of going out in the afternoon. Though I have seen many people love the sun and go for running especially during midday.

I hate summers, the heat, the sun, almost everything about it. But, the only two things I love during this time of the year is of course the worry free binging on ice cream and the abundance of berries. I love ice cream, as long as there is no chocolate involved; yes you heard it right, I don’t like chocolate ice cream.Indian ice cream, kulfi

When we talk about ice cream, one thing I miss after coming to the US is the tall dark mustached kulfi-wala who used to come to our neighborhood during the summer afternoon with his big red cloth covered handi on the back of his cycle. Kulfi, the indigenous Indian ice cream is generally made with non-homogenized milk, boiled to a thick consistency, the creamy fat on top of the milk is called malai, and that where malai kulfi name came from.

Apparently, kulfi was first made in the kitchen of Mughal emperor, Akbar. The ice was brought from the Himalayas to freeze this ice cream. While malai kulfi is the most commonly prepared kulfi, you can also use mango puree to mix with the kulfi mixture to prepare mango kulfi.

Kulfi

 

Malai Kulfi - Indian Spiced Ice Cream
Serves 4
Print
Prep Time
5 min
Cook Time
10 min
Total Time
6 hr 15 min
Prep Time
5 min
Cook Time
10 min
Total Time
6 hr 15 min
Ingredients
  1. 1-1/2 cups half and half, room temperature
  2. ¼ cup condensed milk
  3. ¼ cup milk powder
  4. ½ cup blanched and peeled almond
  5. ⅛ cup shelled and chopped pistachios
  6. 10-12 whole almonds, crushed
  7. ¼ teaspoon saffron
  8. ½ teaspoon green cardamom powder
Instructions
  1. In a blender blend the blanched almonds to a thick paste.
  2. In a heavy bottom pan, preferably non-stick one add the milk powder, slowly pour the condensed milk while stirring the mixture, make sure the milk powder doesn’t form any lump. Once the condensed milk and milk powder is mixed, it will become a thick gooey paste, pour the half and half, and keep on stirring
  3. Now keep the pan over low flame and bring it to simmering bowl, stirring often. Take out about one-fourth cup of the boiling mixture and immerse the saffron in it. Once the saffron is dissolved and color turn yellowish, pour it back in the pan. Give it a stir.
  4. Take out of flame and fold in the almond paste and cardamom powder. Let the pan to cool down completely. Mix the chopped pistachios and almonds.
  5. Pour the mixture in kulfi or popsicle molds, and freeze for at least 6 hours.
Notes
  1. The best way to take out the kulfis without breaking them in halves is to pour hot water over the mold for a few seconds and then inverting the molds on a plate. The kulfi will come out smoothly.
  2. To give the kulfi a mughlai flavor, you can use a drop of rose water and keyra water.
  3. If you don’t have kulfi molds at home, use paper or plastic disposable cups.
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malai kulfi

 

Kachumber – Spicy Indian Salad

 

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I grew up eating salad as a side with spicy Indian food. Be that dum alu or Chittagong chicken, salads were always on the side line. But coming here, and living in the US for almost 4 years now, the take on salad has almost changed, from being a side dish salad has now turned into a meal. Over the years I have started liking the abundance of greens in my salad (read loads of spinach, arugula and how can I forget iceberg lettuce), but when it comes to touching your roots a medley of cucumber, tomatoes and onion always seals the deal.

Mexican pico de gallo comes very close to this garden fresh North Indian green salad, but the vegetables are cut in a little larger size and when its Indian it has to spicier. Generally, cucumber, onions and tomatoes are the main ingredients in this salad, but tamarind is also mixed sometimes to give it a more tangy taste. And, if you want, you can also add a portion of yogurt to make dahi raita.

 

Kachumber

 

 

Kachumber
Yields 1
Print
Prep Time
7 min
Prep Time
7 min
Ingredients
  1. 4 medium cucumbers
  2. 2 tomatoes
  3. 1 medium onion
  4. 2 Thai green chili
  5. 2-3 sprigs of cilantro
  6. 1 teaspoon lime juice
  7. Salt to taste
Instructions
  1. Chop the cucumber, tomatoes and onion to bite size pieces. While doing so, scoop out the seeds from the cucumber and tomatoes with a spoon
  2. Slice the green chili and coarsely chop the cilantro leaves, leave the stalks behind
  3. Mix everything together in a glass bowl, sprinkle with salt and lime juice. Mix and serve with your choice of spicy curry
Notes
  1. The quantity of ingredients depends entirely on you, it doesn't matter if you use 3 cucumbers instead of 4, if it tastes good to you, that's what counts.
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Kachumber

 

Kadhi – Spicy Indian Yogurt Soup

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Stop me if I’m wrong, but in Indian cuisines, and by Indian cuisine I mean cuisines from all parts of the country, there are very few recipes which can be considered as soup. Kadhi, is one of those few dishes that can be considered as soup. You can have it warm and serve it with khichdi or cold as a soup.

Kadhi is a true Indian dish, I say this because, almost the same recipe is followed throughout India. The wiki page on kadhi says that its a Gujrati dish and is popular among people in the Northern states and also among Sindhis. But, while living in the Southern states of India I have had kadhi with the South Indian touch of tempered curry leaves.

Gujrati Kadhi

Gujratis, as I have learnt over the years love their sweets, so even in kadhis they like to add some sugar or jaggery to give it a hint of sweetness. Sindhis like some vegetables in the kadhi, the most popular being okra. Another very common kadhi preparation is kadhi with pakora. The pakoras are made by frying a batter of chickpea and onions, and are dropped in the kadhi.

Growing up in a Bengali family, I had my share of having kadhi for lunch in the summer. My mom used to, actually she still makes sour yogurt at home, everyday all through the year. And, when there is some extra yogurt left she makes the kadhi, but with a touch of Bengali spices in it.

Kadhi

Appetizer, Indian, Yogurt soup, Gujrati kadhi, Kadhi, Indian recipe, Indian spicy yogurt soup, Summer recipe
Cooks in    Serves 4
Ingredients
  • 1 cup sour yogurt
  • 3 tablespoon chickpea flour
  • ½ teaspoon ginger paste
  • 1 teaspoon turmeric powder
  • ½ teaspoon chili powder
  • 3 cups water
  • Salt to taste
  • For tempering:
  • 1 tablespoon mustard oil
  • ½ teaspoon black mustard seeds
  • 10-12 curry leaves
  • 2-3 whole dry red chilies
Directions
  • Take the yogurt is a large bowl and gradually add the chickpea flour to it, mix well so that there are no lumps. Pour the water a cup or less at a time and continue stirring. You can also add everything together and put it in a juicer for 10 seconds to get a good mix
  • Add all the ground spices and season with salt. Give it a good stir
  • Heat the oil in a saucepan, add the mustard seeds, as they start sputtering add the curry leaves and whole red chilies. Pour the yogurt mixture and cook till it just starts to boil. Lower the flame and cook for a minute more. Serve hot or cold.

Kadhi

Hot Tips – Be patient while mixing the ingredients together, mix well so that there are no lumps. It depends on how thick you want your kadhi you can add or reduce the amount of water, also note that that the kadhi thickens after cooling.

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Aamer Dal – Bengali Mango Dal Recipe

 

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ও শিব কবে হবে কাল, নিম দিয়ে ছেচকি আম দিয়ে ডাল

Kolkata has started observing the heat waves for this year. The temperature is going way above the 30°C. To beat the heat and keep the body cool having something bitter or sour is best. By definition though summer is a little away but the markets are flooded with raw mangoes. These sour tasting mangoes are a wonderful ingredient for varieties of Bengali recipes. Starting from the simple dal to chatni and even achar green mangoes are a favorite.

Enlightment

Enlightenment

The green mango dal is a must have in most Bengali families during the summer time. Green mango has some very good health benefits too. The raw mango contains more Vitamin C than the half-ripe or ripe mangoes. It also contains a good amount of Vitamin B1 and B2. To know more about the health benefits of raw mangoes have a look at this article “Eating Mango is Really Beneficial for Health”.

So, Beat the Heat with Raw Mango Daal (Bengali Mango Daal, aamer dal, mango dhal):

Preparation time: 10min

Cooking time: 15min
Serves 4

Aamer Dal - Bengali Mango Daal

Aamer Dal - Bengali Mango Daal

Ingredients:

  • Red Lentil (Masur dal): ½ cup
  • Split Husked Mung Bean (Mung/Moog dal): ½ cup
  • Raw Mango (Kancha aam): 1
  • Turmeric powder (Halud guro): ½ teaspoon
  • Mustard seeds (Sarse dana): 1 tablespoon
  • Mustard oil (Sarser tel): 2 tablespoon
  • Salt to taste

Preparation:

  • Mix the two lentils together and boil with 2 cups of water and salt
  • As the lentils get half cooked add the mango pieces and cook till the lentils are fully cooked
  • Add the turmeric powder and with a wired balloon whisk stir the cooked lentils once or twice
  • Heat the oil in a wok, throw in the mustard seeds and dried chilies
  • As the mustard seeds starts popping pour in the lentils and cook for a minute or two
  • Serve hot with rice for lunch

Further Reading: Chholar Daal, Dal Shukno, Masur Dal – Musurir Daal, Roadside Tadka

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Dim Posto-Sarse (Egg with poppy-mustard paste )

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“Jai Mata Di”

This is the first post of this New Year at Cook Like a Bong. I wish you had a wonderful weekend. Mine was good too. I went out for a short trip to the Himalayas, specifically to Vaishna Devi. For those who are not aware of this holy Hindu shrine, let me give you a little information. The shrine is one of the holiest temples among Hindus, and one of the few temples where the Goddess is worshipped not in the form of any idol but just a little piece of rock. The shrine is located in the Northern State of Jammu & Kashmir and is a 13km trek from a little hill town called Katra. Vaishno Devi or Mata Rani is a manifestation of the mother goddess. As with all Hindu temples and shrines, the Vaishno Devi temple also has some mythological significance, to know more about those stories here.

Amidst a cloud covered sky we reached Katra. The following morning was our trek to the shrine, but the rains and cold were about to wash out everything. Fighting with all natural hazards we still could make out to our destination with a 6 hour trek – walking and by pony at times. The cloud and fog never let us have a view of the mountains, and we were almost heart broken. The aarti and visit to the shrine was a divine experience. After a long and tiring journey, a visit to the temple really had its charming effect. All done, we were to head back again the next morning. Thanks to the all night rain and little snowfall, the next morning was a wonderful experience. We started our journey when it was still dark, and could see the first rays of sun slowly falling over the snow capped mountain. I have watched this very scene many times at different places, but the first ray of sun turning the snow to gold is always a mesmerizing view. We took a helicopter to come down. It was to save time and also to have a once in a lifetime experience in a helicopter. The trip lasted just 3 days with loads of troubles including cancelled flight, lost items in the flight cargo, rains, cold, wet sweaters, walking bare foot on the ice cold stone steps – these incidents made me feel really bad. But while writing this post, I realized I really enjoyed the trip.

Coming back to food, I just thought of writing about this egg in mustard-poppy paste recipe. I had clicked the photo quite some time back, and was waiting for the right time to post it. The first post for this year, rather this decade seemed to be exactly the right time for it. It is an easy recipe and can be had be one and all.

Serves 4

Preparation time 10min

Cooking time 30min


Ingredients:

Egg (Dim): 4

Potato (Alu): 1, large

Mustard seed (Sarse): 4 tablespoon

Poppy seed (Posto): 4 tablespoon

Onion (Peyaj): 1, medium

Turmeric powder (Hau guro): ½ teaspoon

Chili powder (Lanka guro): 1 teaspoon

Mustard oil (Sarser tel): 10-12 tablespoon

Garam masala: ½ teaspoon

Salt to taste

Preparation:

Preparation:

  • Hard boil the eggs, chop the onions finely, slice the potatoes into long pieces, make a paste of mustard and poppy seeds together
  • Heat the half the amount of oil in and fry the chopped onions, keep aside
  • In the same left over oil fry the eggs, keep aside
  • Pour in left over oil and fry the potatoes till half fried
  • In the mean time, mix the chili and turmeric powder to the mustard-poppy paste
  • As the potatoes get half cooked, pour in the spices and little water, cook till the potatoes are almost done
  • Carefully put in the eggs and cook for 2-3mins more, pour in the garam masala powder,  and take out of flame, garnish with the fried onions
  • Serve hot with warm rice

Hot Tips- If you want to make the gravy spicier then add some more mustard and poppy seeds to the paste.

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Gajar Halwa

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“There is a remarkable breakdown of taste and intelligence at Christmastime.  Mature, responsible grown men wear neckties made of holly leaves and drink alcoholic beverages with raw egg yolks and cottage cheese in them.”
– P.J. O’Rourke

There were a lot many troubles going on for the last couple of weeks. My internet connection broke, and then the computer got virus infected and crashed. Above all my Masters first semester exams was going on. The net result, I was not able to write a post for almost a month now. At last hopefully everything is fine now, and back to form.
When it comes to a big get together, or a year end weekend party there has to be a mouthwatering and tempting dessert at the end of the dinner menu. It was my mom and sister’s birthday on 24th, and so the house was packed with guests and relatives. Searching through Sanjeev Kapoor’s book on microwave cooking got hold of an easy way of cooking carrot pudding, the better way to call it – Gajar ka Halwa. The preparation turned out to be a very tasty one. I used the sugar free, as most of the family members are diabetic.

There is something very peculiar about this winter season. The weather is so dull and dry, but the veggies and fruits you get at this time of the year are so colorful. These days I just love going to the farmer’s market, shopping for vegetables – all of them looking so colorful and vibrant. The carrots in there bright reddish orange tinge are a must buy this season. Gajar halwa is best prepared with Delhi carrots, the ones that are long and reddish in color. Carrots are very good for the eyes due to the high amount of Vitamin A present.

Serving: 6
Preparation time: 15min
Cooking time: 20min

Ingredients:

Carrots (Gajar): 1kg

Milk (Dudh): 1 ½ litre

Sugar (Chini): ½ cup

Khoya: 200gms

Clarified Butter (Ghee): 2 tablespoons

Cardamom (Elaichi): 3-4 powdered

Almonds (Kaath Badam): 12-14

Raisins (Kismis): 2 tablespoons, soaked

Preparation:

  • Put the almonds in a microwave safe bowl and pour in water till they are covered fully. Microwave high uncovered for 3-4min. Take them out and cool those down till you can hold the nuts, peel off and chop into thin slices, keep aside.
  • Take the grated carrots in a microwave safe deep bowl and mix well with 1 ½ tablespoon of ghee. Microwave high covered for 10min, or till they become soft. Stir once or twice in between
  • Pour in the milk and again microwave high covered for 8-10mins, stirring once or twice in between.
  • Add the sugar and khoya and cook in microwave high uncovered for 5-6min
  • Take out and garnish with almonds, and raisins

Hot tips – While grating the carrots, it’s better to leave out the hard middle part of the carrot. You can put in a little coloring agent, to have the bright color of the halwa.

Further readingsGajar Halwa by Bon Vivant

1 Serving of raw grated carrot
Amount Per Serving
Calories 45.1
Total Fat 0.3 g
Saturated Fat 0.0 g
Polyunsaturated Fat 0.1 g
Monounsaturated Fat 0.0 g
Cholesterol 0.0 mg
Sodium 75.9 mg
Potassium 352.0 mg
Total Carbohydrate 10.5 g
Dietary Fiber 3.1 g
Sugars 5.0 g
Protein 1.0 g
Vitamin A 264.8 %
Vitamin B-12 0.0 %
Vitamin B-6 7.6 %
Vitamin C 10.8 %
Vitamin D 0.0 %
Vitamin E 2.5 %
Calcium 3.6 %
Copper 2.5 %
Folate 5.2 %
Iron 1.8 %
Magnesium 3.3 %
Manganese 7.9 %
Niacin 5.4 %
Pantothenic Acid 3.0 %
Phosphorus 3.9 %
Riboflavin 3.8 %
Selenium 0.2 %
Thiamin 4.8 %
Zinc 1.8 %

Sending this recipe to my dear friend Radhika’s event for this month – Delectable Desserts, Pastries & Ice Creams, another friend Arundhuti has recently announced her first blog event, this carrot pudding is on her way to to her Served with Love event and also to MEC: Festive Food hosted by Cham, this event is the brain child of Srivalli

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Mishti Doi

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“De doi, de doi paate| ore beta haari haate||”

The above quote is from a poem I read long time back, but can’t exactly remember the poet now. It says, give me the sweet yogurt the one who carries the pot with him.

Mishti Doi

A few days back when I saw Dolon write about Mishti doi on her blog, the sweet greedy Bong awoke within me. Mishti doi reminds me, and probably all Bengalis an earthen pot filled with a brownish mass of sweet curd. Misti doi is an inseparable part of all festivals in Bengal- be that a tika (a dot on the forehead) for Bhai phota (festival to mark the well being of brother), or the charanamitro (offering made to God during worship), or just a dessert to end the meal for a feast.  While we were searching for links on Mishti doi, K found an interesting one. I never knew this; SJ prepared it in an oven. That is really a nice and quick way to prepare misti doi, I believe. The post even wrote about the mention of curds in Vedas as the “Food of God”, and probably that explains why it’s offered during all rituals.

I have tried out mishti dahi in Bangalore too, but here it’s sold in plastic containers. The smell of the wet earthen pot holding the misti doi gives the actual feel of this dessert. So, when I came back to Kolkata yesterday I just couldn’t wait to devour some misti doi. Earthen pots are easily available here, and mom had some handy in her kitchen, so that was not a problem at all. While the color of the yogurt helps all to remind them of this dessert, there are some sweet shops in Kolkata too where mishti dahi looks white similar to the set sour curd.

Mishti doi though a very popular dessert throughout Bengal, it is rarely prepared at home. This may probably because it’s readily available in the market (sweet shops in Bengal are more frequent than light posts on the streets) and also preparing it takes a long time almost over night and even more. So a time taking recipe, but still is worth all the labor. Here, it is all for you to grab.

Cooking time: 35min
Preparation time: 5min
Incubation: Overnight (10-11hr)
Makes half-litre of yogurt

Ingredients:

  • Full Cream Milk (Dudh): 1ltr
  • Sugar (Chini): 8 tablespoon
  • Yogurt (Dahi): 1 tablespoon
  • 1 Earthen pot (optional)

Preparation:

  • Pour the milk in a thick bottom vessel and start heating over low flame
  • As it starts boiling add 4 tablespoons of sugar and keep on simmering till the volume is reduced to little less than half
  • Take the remaining sugar with 2 tablespoons of water and heat till the sugar melts and attains a golden brown color
  • Gradually add the molten sugar over the milk and boil for another 15 minutes over low flame
  • Take out of flame and let it become lukewarm
  • Pour the milk over the earthen pot and add the yogurt
  • Keep the pot in a cool dry place, and let the yogurt set over night
  • Refrigerate the set dahi and serve as a dessert

Mishti Doi

Hot tips – Instead of using yogurt to set the dahi, freeze-dried bacteria can also be used for the same purpose.

Further readings – Bengali sweetsYogurt in ten steps, List of misti doi

Linda is celebrating the World Breast Feeding Week on her blog with the event Got Milk?. Mishti doi is on way to the event.

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Patishapta

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“There is only one difference between a long life and a good dinner: that, in the dinner, the sweets come last.”

– R.L. Stevenson

I discovered a jar of rice flour a couple of days back. I don’t remember since how long it had been there in  my kitchen, but the flour looked good, and the texture was also perfect. So, I thought of preparing some patishapta to have a sweet tooth feast. Patishapta reminds me of those Poush Sankranti days at my grandparents house. There would be a feast for three days and my Dida (my mom’s mom) would prepare those patishapta sitting near the brick stove (she preferred the brick stove over the gas oven) all day long. I have never seen such perfect patishapta after her. Those more so soft and moist and the colour was a perfect tinge of very very light brown. It was almost like a ritual for all the kids at home to steal some of those hot patishapta.

patishapta1

Before going to the recipe details, just a little note about patishapta. Patishapta is the most popular among all pitha (also, pithe) prepared during Sankranti (Sankranthi, in South India). In simple words, patishapta is actually a rice flour crepe with coconut and jaggery fillings. The softness of the crepe and the sweet filling inside makes it the best pitha and most commonly prepared pitha. Though cakes, pastries and various other sweets are in vogue in almost every household, but I would say those who have at least tasted patishapta ones will never say no to it.

Preparation time: 10min

Cooking time: 25mins

Makes 10 patishapta

Ingredients:

For the filling-

  • Grated Coconut (Narkel Kora): 3cups
  • Jaggery (Gur): 1cup
  • Cardamom powder (Elaich): 1/4 teaspoon

For the crepes-

  • Wheat flour (Maida): 1cup
  • Seomlina (Suji): 1/2 cup
  • Rice flour (Chal guro): 1/2cup
  • Milk (Dudh): 1cup
  • Sunflower oil for frying

Preparation:

For the filling-

  • In a wok heat the jaggery, as it start melting add the coconut
  • Put in the cardamom powder and stir till the coconut mixes well with the jaggery
  • Cook till the coconut feels sticky
  • Take out of flame and keep aside

For the crepes-

  • Add all dry ingredients together and mix well
  • Pour the milk with constant stirring to avoid lump formation, the batter should be smooth and freely flowing (add excess milk if required)
  • Heat a frying pan (preferably non-stick) and pour in 1 tablespoon on oil, spread it with a kitchen paper
  • Take a small bowl of batter and spread it evenly on the pan to make a round shape, do it quick before the batter sets
  • Place the filling lengthwise at the center of the crepe
  • Fold the crepe from both sides and wait till it turns light brown
Patishapta

Patishapta

Hot tips – If you don’t have a non-stick pan, don’t worry. Cut the upper part of an egg plant, keeping the stalk intact and spread the oil over the pan using it instead of a  kitchen paper.

Further Reading – Poush Parboner PatishaptaPitheHarvest foodFood During Sankranti

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Begun Morichut

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This is my fiftieth post here on this blog. I thank all my blog visitors for giving me the courage and inspiration to go ahead and write new posts on my blog, and most of all I thank my parents and sister. My mom who taught me to love the art of cooking, and my father though never enters the kitchen always find it tempting to know whats cooking on my blog. My little sister who is always busy taking photographs of every step and every ,eal I cook, when I am at home in Kolkata.

To mark this happy event for me, I have prepared  a typical dish which hails from Chittagong in Bangaladesh‘. Now, this is a bit tricky, why should I be cooking something that sounds and tastes like a typical Bangladeshi dish. The answer is simple, my grandfathers, both from my father’s as well as from my mother’s sides were inhabitants of then unpartitioned Bengal. After the partition in 1947, they came and settled in Kolkata. As everybody say you can take out the Bengali from Bengal, but not the Bengal from the Bengali, so was it. At home our cooking style resembles those of the people of Bangladesh, though I am the third generation who is living in India and never had a luck to see the place where my grandparents were born and lived the best days of their lives.

Morichut is a typical naming for any curry in their native language of Chittagong. I love this one with eggs and aubergines. Morichut also can be made using potatoes. May be I’ll write a post on that sometime later.

Serves 2

Ingredients:

Aubergine (Choto Begun): 200gms

Onion (Peyaj): 1 medium size

Eggs (Dim): 2

Mustard Oil (Sarser Tel): ½ teaspoon

Turmeric Powder (Halud Guro): ½ teaspoon

Green Chili (Kacha Lanka): 1 or 2

Salt to taste

Preparation:

  • Heat oil in a shallow wok
  • Add the onions to sauté as the oil gets heated
  • Toss in the aubergine cut into small square shaped pieces and fry till they are partly cooked
  • Add salt, turmeric and the green chili
  • Keep aside the half cooked egg plants, and heat 1 teaspoon of oil and add the eggs.
  • Scramble the eggs and add it to the half cooked aubergine
  • Cook till the aubergine gets cooked

begun-morichut

It tastes good with roti, paratha or even rice. So cook it and have with anything you like.

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Khichudi

Khichudi, the name reminds me of those rainy days and rainy nights. Khichudi had always taken a special soft corner in my heart. Mom used to cook it whenever it started and rain means no going out and so everybody at home. The whole family waiting impatiently for the hot and yummy porridge to be served at the dining table. I especially remember one night. It was raining cats and dogs; mom was very ill that night and couldn’t even get up from bed. But we were all in full mood to enjoy khichudi. So what to do? The answer came from my dad, let’s prepare it ourselves. Hearing that my mom started screaming, here to mention at that time my dad was a terrible cook, though with the passage of time and because of his transferable job he has learnt a lot about cooking. Now let’s go back to that night. So here we were me and my dad in the kitchen preparing porridge. That night at last we had to call a nearby restaurant to deliver food, that porridge was absolutely burnt and had to throw away everything.

Khichudi with potato fry

Khichudi with potato fry

Days have passed, a lot has changed, but still I can’t separate monsoon rain and porridge. I have learnt to prepare it myself and so whenever it rains, you can smell khichudi in my kitchen. Oh! I missed out something. To make this delicacy something more special don’t you forget to fry those hilsa pieces or at least an omelet. This combination is just awesome.

Serves: 4

Ingredients:

Rice (Chal): 150 gm

Pulses (Massor dal): 150 gm

Turmeric powder (Halud Guro): 1 teaspoon

Chilli powder (Sukhno Lankar guro): 1 teaspoon

Onions (Peyaj): 3

Garlic (Rasun): 4 /6 cloves

Ginger paste (Aada Bata)

Panch Phoron: 1 teaspoon

Green chilli (Kacha Lanka): 2/3 pieces

Mustard oil (Sarser tel): 2 teaspoon

Salt to taste

Preparation:

So we are ready with the ingredients, now before we start just a few word. Cut one of the onions into half and the other two julienned. You can add some vegetables like potato , cauliflower (cut into small florets), carrot, peas, etc.

  • Wash the rice and dal together.
  • Take water in a handi and heat it just for 2 minutes.powder,
  • Add the rice, dal, half cut onion, garlic cloves, vegetables, turmeric powder, chilli green chilli and salt.
  • Now leave it and let it cook by itself.
  • Add water whenever required.
  • When the rice is almost cooked, heat oil in an wok and add the left out onions and panch phoron. Sauté it.
  • Add this to the cooked rice.
  • Then cook the rice for 2 minutes more and your porridge is ready to serve.

Khichudi

Khichudi with ladies finger fries
You can have it with any kind of fries, or even with chutney and papad (poppadam). There are some more ways to cook porridge, check out my following posts to find out how.

Tips: Porridge tends to become very dry, so before you take it out of the stove ensure that it has not become too dry and so leave out some water.

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