Kolkata Street Aloo Dum

Have you ever tried the spicy and tangy aloo dum from phuchkawala in Kolkata? It is one of the spiciest thing you can ever eat. The heat from chilies and sour taste of the tamarind pulp mixed with the just well done baby potatoes, makes this street food one of my favorite. As I am writing this post, I am literally salivating remembering the paper plate full of fingerlicking good  baby potatoes aloo dum on my last trip to Kolkata.


Potatoes have a special place in every Bengali’s heart. The comforting aloo chokha (Bengali version of mashed potatoes) or half cut potatoes in kansha mangsho (spicy mutton curry) – we like our potatoes anywhere and everywhere. But when it comes to aloo dum – it is like a Christmas in summer. The Kolkata street style aloo dum is a favorite everywhere whether it’s a side for luchi on a Sunday morning or an accompaniment with alcohol on a Friday night party. Try this recipe and you’ll know what I mean. You can also serve this aloo dum on phuchka to make alu dum phuchka, load it with loads of green chilies, cilantro and dash of tamarind pulp. I have adapted this recipe from Ishita’s Kolkata style spicy baby potatoes.


Kolkata Style Aloo Dum
Serves 4
Prep Time
10 min
Cook Time
20 min
Prep Time
10 min
Cook Time
20 min
  1. 1 lb boiled baby potatoes
  2. 2 - 3 big bay leaves
  3. 1 medium onion, finely chopped
  4. 1 tablespoon ginger paste
  5. 1 tablespoon garlic paste
  6. 1 teaspoon turmeric powder
  7. 1 teaspoon chili powder
  8. 1 teaspoon cumin powder
  9. ½ teaspoon coriander powder
  10. 2 tablespoon tamarind pulp
  11. ¼ cup chopped cilantro leaves
  12. 1 teaspoon rock salt
  13. Freshly squeezed juice of 1 lime
  14. 1 teaspoon roasted cumin seeds, coarsely grounded
  15. 2 - 3 green chilies, coarsely chopped, optional
  16. 2 tablespoon mustard oil
  17. Salt to taste
  18. ½ teaspoon sugar, optional
  1. Mix a pinch of turmeric powder, salt and sugar, if using with the baby potatoes. Heat the oil in a heavy bottom pan, and fry the potatoes till they start turning slightly brown about 3 minutes. Take out of the pan and keep aside
  2. In the same pan add the chopped onions and bay leaves and fry till the onion is almost done, about 5 minutes. Add in the ginger and garlic paste and fry for another 2 -3 minutes, or till the oil starts separating
  3. In the meantime, in a small bowl take about ¼ cup water and all the dry spice powder, stir to make a smooth paste. Pour in the spice paste to the fried onion mix and toss for a minute.
  4. Add the reserved baby potatoes and pour in the tamarind paste. Toss to coat. Pour about a cup of water and season with salt, if you are using rock salt then use little less salt than you would use.
  5. Cook on high for about 5 minutes or till the potatoes break once pressed
  6. Transfer to a serving platter and garnish with chopped cilantro, green chilies and roasted cumin powder, sprinkle the rock salt and pour in the lime juice
  1. Boil the potatoes skin on and about a teaspoon of salt to the water. Boil till the potatoes are not fully cooked. Once you are able to touch the potatoes, peel the skin off
  2. When serving you can pour another tablespoon of tamarind pulp thinned with water, to get a tangy taste
  3. The spice level mentioned above will yield a mildly spiced aloo dum, if you want more heat add more chili powder to the aloo dum
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Kolkata Street Food Ghugni – Curried Dried Yellow Peas

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When it comes to street food, Kolkata reigns. The city of joy has hundreds of street snacks to offer. It’s not only about jhal muri, bhel puri, papri chat, or tele bhaja, you’ll find a whole lot more. And, just when you thought you have had your share of junk food for the day there is always the kulfi and the crushed ice serbet to chill with.

Talking about Kolkata street food and not mentioning phuchka will be like having pizza without cheese. Phuchka is the most well known among all street foods in Kolkata. You’ll find phuchka sellers near every bus stand and at every corner of the neighborhood streets. Phuchka in whole and its crushed coungter part, churmur is the queen of street foods in Kolkata. Check Kankana’s write-up on Kolkata’s street food and drool over the amazing photos.

Next in line are the egg roll sellers. Come evening and there are people swarmed around the big hot tawa of the egg roll maker. Another street food though not much mentioned is ghugni. Ghugni sellers are a little hard to find, but you’ll definitely find the in all fairs and near every cinema theatre. Ghugn is a rich and spicy preparation made from dried yellow peas. The hot taste of ginger garlic paste mingles with the tanginess of tamarind water to make it street food ambrosia. Ghugni is my second favorite street food of Kolkata, of course phuchka comes first. What’s your favorite street food?


 Serves 4
Preparation time: Overnight soaking + 45minutes 


  • 2 cups ghugni chola/ dried yellow peas
  • ½ cup grounded chicken
  • 1 medium size potato
  • ¼ cup chopped onion
  • 4-5 cloves garlic, chopped coarsely
  • 1 teaspoon turmeric powder
  • 1 teaspoon chili powder
  • 1 tablespoon ginger-garlic paste
  • 2 tablespoon cumin seeds, roasted and grinded
  • 3-4 green chilies
  • 4 tablespoons tamarind water
  • 4 tablespoons mustard oil
  • Salt to taste


  • Soak the ghugni beans overnight, cook in a pressure cooker till two whistles. Drain out the excess water and keep for later use
  • Cut the potatoes into 1” squares, wash and add a pinch of salt and turmeric.  Heat about 2 tablespoons of oil in a wok, and lightly fry the potatoes. Take out and drain the excess oil on a kitchen towel
  • Pour rest of the oil in the same wok. Add the onion and garlic and fry till the onions are translucent. Add the grounded chicken, all the spices and season with salt. Stir till the oil separates and the chicken turns a darker shade
  • Add the boiled ghugni beans and stir for further 2-3 minutes. Pour in about 1 ½ cup of warm water and cook till half done.
  • Add the half fried potatoes and cook till its done. Take out from the flame serve hot garnished with chopped onions, cucumber, roasted cumin powder and tamarind water.


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This ghugni recipe goes to Blogoversary Event and Giveaway

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Churmur – The Bengali Roadside Snack

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When you grow up in a city and you have to leave your familiar streets, roads, stores all of a sudden it feels a radical change. I have grown up in Kolkata most part of my childhood and teenage have passed in the city of joy. And then I had to leave – first to Bangalore and then to a whole different country, to the United States.

Its been almost 5 years since I left Kolkata, but there are still some little things that tend to draw me towards the undying city. Of course my folks are there and so there is a special bond. But, what am talking about is the dusty roads, the sweaty rickshaw wala, the continuous honking of buses and cars and of course the phuchka.

While in Bangalore, I still used to get the cousin of phuchka – golgappa though they used mint paste and onions in the filling (which I hate). But, here in the US phuchka is a far off thing.

The last time I went to my local grocery store, there was this plastic box of golgappas sitting at one corner of the aisle, and I just grabbed them. That evening was a nice one – a treat with phuchka, though they still missed something. My father would probably call that to be the sweat of the vendor and Kolkata’s dust.

The other popular snack from the same phuchkawala is the alu kabli and churmur. Alu kabli is the spicy hot and sour mixture of bite size boiled potatoes. Churmur is the broken down version of phuchka, or rather its a transition between alu kabli and phuchka.


Snack, Indian, Roadside snack, Bengali roadside recipe, Unhealthy tasty food
Cooks in    Serves 2
  • 10-12 phuchka balls
  • 1 medium size potato, boiled and chopped to bite size pieces
  • 1/4 cup soaked and boiled round chickpeas/ Bengal gram
  • 1 teaspoon roasted cumin powder
  • ½ teaspoon chilli powder
  • ½ teaspoon rock salt or kosher salt
  • A few sprigs of cilantro, chopped finely
  • 2-3 green chillies, chopped finely
  • 1/8 cup tamarind juice, flowy consistency
  • 1 teaspoon of lime juice
  • Mix all the dry ingredients with the potatoes, it’s better not to mash the potatoes
  • Crumble the phuchka balls and add it to the potato mix
  • Add the chickpeas, green chillies, cilantro, lime juice and tamarind paste; and give it a final toss
  • Serve immediately.

Share your phuchka story with us.

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Mowa & Murki on Lakshmi Puja

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Sarat kal” – does that ring any bell? Of course it does. Other than the brilliant blue sky dotted with soft white clouds it’s that time of the year when you let go of all worries and enjoy the four days of Durga Puja. For our non-Bong friends, Sarat kal is the autumn season according to the Bengali calendar. Durga Puja, doesn’t only mean worshipping the goddess of feminine power, but a lot more – shopping before the puja, pandal hopping during the four days, and of course eating and eating and more eating.

I’m sure you all have left your health conscious souls at home and gorged on the wonderful street foods. I just can’t think about passing a puja without gulping on some phuchkas (fuchka) and biting on egg rolls. What’s your Puja special dish, do let us know?

Just after Durga Puja is Lakshmi puja. The goddess of wealth and well being is ushered to almost every Bengali household (though some people worship the goddess on Kali Puja day). This year Lakshmi Puja will be celebrated tomorrow.

After numerous calls, e-mails, wall posts and scraps from friends from all over the globe, I decided on posting something which is specially made for this occasion – murki and mowa (pronounced as moa).

Murki is made from a special variety of puffed rice called Khoi in Bengali and is mixed with molasses or gur. Mowa on the other hand can be prepared with Khoi, mudi or even chidde. Here’s how my mom prepares both these two sweet ambrosia. The basic method of preparation is the same.


For murki:

½ kg of Puffed Rice (Khoi)

250gms of Molasses/ Jaggery (Gur)


  • Start stirring the jaggery over low heat.
  • As it turns sticky and sticks to the back of the ladle, take out of flame
  • Pour of the khoi and mix well
  • Keep aside in air tight container

For mowa:

  • Take about 350gms of jaggery
  • Mix the jaggery and khoi/muri/chidde together
  • With the help of your palm make big balls
  • Store in air tight containers

Mowa is still in the making, will put up the photo as soon as its done.

Don’t forget to have a copy of our Festive recipe e-book and the October calendar. And do send in your entries to the ongoing event Cooking with Seeds – Poppy, a brain child of Priya from Priya’s Easy and Tasty Recipes.

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Guest Post – Beguni

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Ask any Bengali what adda means, the answer will be unanimously a lazy evening, a large bowl of puffed rice and plate full of beguni. If you have never tested or tasted this pleasure, then you should do this evening. I am sure that the begunis bring out loads of more lost stories from your heart than you really intend to spill :).

When I had posted a little note on the Cook Like a Bong Facebook fanpage requesting for entries as guest posts in our blog, Arundhuti from My Saffron Kitchen was the first to reply. I was more than happy to accept this offer from such a dear friend. Arundhuti is an excellent person and you can dig into her blog to have great ideas for your next meal.

A darling ally and a plate full of begunis, what more can I wish. Here’s the quick and easy recipe of beguni straight from Arundhuti’s kitchen.

Deep fried aubergine fritters


  • Eggplants (baingan) – 1 large, cut into thin slices
  • Gram flour – 1 cup
  • Refined flour – 1/4 cup
  • Onion seeds – 1 tsp.
  • Red chilli powder – 1/2 tsp.
  • Baking soda – 1/2 tsp.
  • Salt as per taste
  • Enough water to make a thick batter
  • Oil for frying


  • Mix together the gramflour, refined flour, onions seeds, red chilli powder, baking soda, salt and water.
  • Heat oil in a thick bottomed pan. Lower the heat.
  • Dip the eggplant pieces in the batter and then fry in hot oil till they are cooked and golden brown in colour.
  • Drian excess oil and serve hot.

Read more at Arundhuti’s blog.

Further readings – Lotiya Vada, Macher dimer Vada (Roe fritters)

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Khandvi: Gujrati Snack

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I have a good news to share with all of you. Palki, the only online Bengali magazine has recently published their 8th edition. Some of the photographs clicked by me and Kalyan, and also a recipe (Titor dal) have been published in this edition.

I had been utterly busy with my assignments and classes. The exams are knocking at the door and loads and loads of syllabus to cover. But, the majority of the day am playing Farmville in FaceBook and may be a little of going through the texts. I have almost forgotten the route to our kitchen. This Khandvi recipe was in drafts for quite a long time now.

Khandvi is one of the typical Gujrati dishes that I just adore. It is a wholesome meal so as to say, with chickpea flour and sour curd and very little oil, Khandvi is just the best idea for those who are on diet and also for those of us who just love food.

Makes: 20 pieces
Cooking Time: 15 -20 minutes + 15 minutes for making into rolls
Preparation Time: 5 minutes


Makes: 20 -25 pieces
Cooking Time: 15 -20 minutes + 15 minutes for making into rolls
Preparation Time: 5 minutes


Chickpea flour (Besan): 1 cup

Sour yogurt (Tauk doi): 1 cup

Water (Jal): 2 cups

Green chili paste (Kancha lanka bata): 1 teaspoon

Turmeric powder (Halud guro): ¼ teaspoon

Mustard seed (Sarse): ½ teaspoon

Cumin seed (Jeera): ½ teaspoon

Curry leaves (Kari pata): 5-6

Grated coconut (Narkel kora): 2 tablespoons

Chopped coriander (Dhane pata): 2 tablespoons

Vegetable oil (Sada tel): 2 tablespoons

Salt to taste


  • Whisk the yogurt, water and chickpea flour.
  • Add green chili and ginger paste, turmeric powder and salt. Whisk until well blended.
  • Pour in the mixture in a non-stick pan and heat on low flame with constant stirring to prevent formation of lumps
  • Continue till the mixture thickens , approximately for 10-15mins
  • Spread the hot mixture on the back of a steel plate as thinly as possible, with a flat spatula (preferably wooden).
  • When you have finished spreading the batter, allow it to cool a little and settle down.
  • Cut the spread into 2 inch thick long strips, and try rolling these strips length wise
  • Place the cut rolls on a serving dish.
  • Heat oil in a wok
  • Toss in mustard seeds, cumin seeds, wait till they start cracking; add the curry leaves
  • Sprinkle the seasoning over the khandvi and garnish with coriander leaves and coconut.

Khaman Khandvi

Hot tips – You can also spread the chickpea flour mixture over a clean black stone table of your kitchen. Be patient while rolling the khandvis, because they tend to break.

Further ReadingSabjimata’s Khandvi

Sending this tasty snacks to Festive snacks of Navratri & Diwali hosted by Indrani.

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Prepare Phuchka (Golgappa) at home

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“When people wore hats and gloves, nobody would dream of eating on the street. Then white gloves went out of style and, suddenly, eating just about anything in the street became OK.”

–          Jane Addison, quoted in the Great Food Almanac by Irena Chalmers

Street food in Kolkata epitomizes the pada (neighborhood) culture. Having something at the nearest roadside vendor is not only about eating and fulfilling ones gastronomic urges, but it is also a means of having food with family, friends and sometimes even strangers. Street foods that are in vogue are phuchka, jhal muri, papri chat, muri makha, vegetable chop, and beguni, but phuchka ranks above all. Someone from South Calcutta won’t find it a pain to travel all the way to Bowbazar (for the uninitiated in Calcutta’s geography, Bowbazar is almost an hour drive from South Calcutta) just to confront his friends that the phuchka wala at his pada is better than theirs.

Now, by “street food”, I don’t mean what one can get in the big or even the small restaurants, roadside food is that what you get from the makeshift stalls on the foot path of whole of Bengal. There are also other names for it in the different states of India. Some call it Pani Puri, some golgappa. But if you ask any Calcuttan he/she will say phuchka is definitely different from golgappa or panipuri. The difference may be obscure, probably it’s only the colloquial term that varies, but there is a little difference in one of the ingredients that significantly differentiates phuchka from all its synonyms. The vendors in Bengal use gandhoraj lebu (a typical lemon produced in suburbs of Bengal) to flavor the filling and the tamarind water of phuchka. And this is where all the difference is.


Kolkata street food is such a rage, that there are places in different part of India and even abroad holding “Calcutta street food festival”. When I started having phuchka, as far as I remember it was 5 for a rupee and the last time I had it back in Kolkata I got three for two rupees. Though here in Bangalore there are places where you get pani puri that almost tastes like those back in Kolkata, but are highly priced. Talking about phuchka, I can’t leave the phuckhwalas, people who sell the phuchka. They are mostly from Bihar/Jharkhand, and you just can’t beat them with their style of the phuchka preparation.

Cooking time: 8-10min

Preparation time: 12min

Makes 20 phuchka


  • Phuchka balls: 20
  • Potato(Alu): 2 large
  • Whole Bengal gram (Chola): 2 tablespoon, soaked
  • Green chili (Kacha Lanka): 4, chopped finely
  • Cumin (Jeera): 1 teaspoon, roasted and then grinded
  • Lemon juice (Pati lebu ras): 1 teaspoon
  • Cilantro (Dhane pata): Chopped to 2 tablespoon
  • Tamarind pulp (Tetul): 4 tablespoon
  • Salt to taste


  • Boil the potatoes with the skin on, peel off after boiling and mash properly so that no lumps remain
  • Add soaked bengal gram green chili, cumin powder, lemon juice, one tablespoon of cilantro to the mashed potato and mix well
  • Take the tamarind pulp in a big bowl and add 2 cups of water to it with salt and the rest of the cilantro, mix well
  • Add 2 tablespoon of the tamarind water to the mashed potatoes and keep the rest aside
  • Break just the upper part of one phuchka ball and put in one teaspoon of the filling, fill the other balls also similarly
  • Serve with the rest of the tamarind water
Phuchka with tamarind water

Phuchka with tamarind water

Hot Tips – Though not the basic component, you may also like to add some chopped onions to the filling to make it spicier.

Further Reading – Rasta Nasta, Sasta way, Crazy Street Food of Kolkata

Phuchka is the ideal recipe to send for the “Family Recipe” event at The Life and Loves of Grumpy Honey Bunch co-hosted by Laura of The Spiced Life.

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Egg Roll

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“A true friend is someone who thinks that you are a good egg even though he knows that you are slightly cracked” – Bernard Meltzer

The final recipe for the “Breakfast with eggs” series is Egg roll. I’ve posted six different easy to cook and quick egg recipes for the morning meal. Previous posts in the series:

  1. Mughlai Paratha
  2. French Toast
  3. Scrambled Eggs
  4. Banana Pancake
  5. Boiled Egg Sandwich

But I just couldn’t finish the series without a little flavor from the street food of Calcutta (Kolkata). Though many different Asian countries claim for the origin of this dish and among them southern China has the most number of votes, but this particular preparation very well known to everybody who hails from Kolkata or even those who had a visit to the city is typically from the make shift stalls on Kolkata foot paths.

Egg roll

Egg rol

There was one such stall near my dance school called Iceberg (quite contradictory for a joint that sold everything hot), and every month it was a ritual for our gang of friends to have an egg roll from there. I still remember it cost just seven rupees then, but still that was quite expensive for a school-going girl like me. At home, outside food was a taboo and so I always had to cook some stories to have those egg rolls. But alas, eventually mom found out my secret and instead of scolding me I was offered with two egg rolls the next day at tiffin, of course prepared by my mom in her kitchen. School days have passed a long time ago, but I still can’t forget the taste of those road side egg rolls, though my mom’s were quite similar but not that good. My father suggested that the dirt from the road made it taste better.

The egg roll in Kolkata is similar to Frankie of Mumbai and resembles the kathi rolls prepared in many roadside stalls throughout India. Egg roll in Kolkata was probably first introduced by Nizam’s, a very popular restaurant in Kolkata serving Mughlai dishes. Another famous joint serving egg roll in Kolkata is Haji Saheb in Behala (Hazi Saheb for some), it’s my personal request, don’t miss it if you ever visit this place.

Preparation time: 10mins

Cooking time: 8mins

Serves: 2


  • Whole wheat flour (Maida): 1 cup
  • Eggs (Dim): 2
  • Onion (Peyaj): 1 medium, chopped finely
  • Cucumber (Sasha): one-half of a medium sized, julienned
  • Green chili (Kacha lanka): 2, chopped
  • Sunflower oil (Sada tel) for frying
  • Salt to taste
  • Tomato sauce for seasoning


  • Knead the flour well and make two round paratha with it
  • Beat the eggs with little salt
  • Heat one tablespoon of oil in a frying pan and add one beaten egg to it, spread it so as to have almost the same diameter as the parantha
  • Carefully place the parantha over the half fried omelet and allow it to cook for two more minutes, turn around the paratha and cook the other side for one minute and take out from the frying pan
  • Place the egg covered paratha on a flat surface with the egg side up
  • Add chopped cucumber, chilies and onion at the centre of the paratha to make the filling and pour the tomato sauce over the vegetables
  • Roll the paratha and cover half of it with an aluminum foil or kitchen paper and tuck the paper well so that the roll doesn’t open up
  • Serve hot with little lemon juice over the filling

Hot tips – You can put in a filling of mashed potatoes seasoned with chili powder and salt or even a filling with chicken or mutton kebab tastes great.

What variety of Egg Roll do you prefer?

Further reading – Nizam’s Kathi Roll, When in Kolkata, Egg Paratha

Nutrition calculator – 1 egg roll

Calories 580
Total Carbohydrate 46gms
Dietary fiber 3.9gms
Protein 35gm
Total fat 28gms
Cholesterol 365mg
Sugar 2gms
Vitamin A 20%
Vitamin C 0%
Iron 10%
Calcium 8%

Sending this to NTTC#5 event hosted by Sneh of Gel’s Kitchen.

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Roadside Tadka

I have posted this recipe before but its for Srivalli that I am posting it once more to participate in the event hosted by her.

Serves 2


Green Mugh dal: 150gms

Tomato: 2 medium sizes

Onion (Peyaj): 2 large ones

Garlic (Rasun): 7 or 8 cloves

Kasturi Methi (Fenugreek leaves): 1 tablespoon

Green chili (Sukhno Lanka): 3

Turmeric powder (Halud guro): 1 teaspoon

Sunflower Oil (Saada tel): 2 tablespoons

Salt to taste

The Ingredients

The Ingredients


  • Soak the mugh dal for about an hour.
  • Pressure cook for at 2 to 3 whistles.
  • Drain the excess water out of the dal and keep aside.
  • Cut the onions in square pieces, and the chilies into small ringlets.
  • Heat the oil in a shallow wok.
  • As the oil gets heated throw in the onions to sauté along with the garlic.
  • As the onions become tender, add tomatoes and chili, sauté for 2 more minutes.
  • Add the mugh dal, turmeric powder, salt and toss well.
  • Add little water if necessary and in between mash the dal properly.
  • Now add the Kasturi Methi to the preparation and mix well.
  • Scramble to eggs in a separate frying pan with little salt and throw in to the Tarka preparation.
  • Take it out of flame as it gets dried up.
Tarka with roti, curd and onion

Tarka with roti, curd and onion

It tastes best with roti or paratha and a little bit of curd and onions. You can add chicken or mutton keema, or anything of your choice. Tarka also tastes good without adding any other non-vegetarian items to it. So, you can have it without any other supplementary to it. Catch you soon, till then Happy Cooking and Happy Eating.

Sending my recipe to Srivalli’s Announcing My Legume Love Affair, Seventh Helping! , the event brain child of Well-Seasoned Cook Susan .


Alu Kabli

When I was young and still a school going child, my mom was very particular about my hygiene. She never used to let me have anything prepared on the streets, but that led me to break the rule and indulge having roadside food. Everyday when I used to comeback from school I used stop at the nearest chaat stall and had my share of alu kabli. Alu Kabli or alu chaat as they call it in most parts of India is very popular among all students, but to disclose the secret it tempts all. My mom used to scold me for having street junks, but I could never kill my temptation to have the small bowl full of alu chaat. School days have passed years ago, but I still can’t resist the smell and taste of alu chaat.

The tamarind paste and the green chilies mix to create an ecstatic smell of freshness, which I have never got from any dish I had. The spices make a brilliant hot and sour combination, and of course the potatoes and chickpeas add to the joy of having it. This evening when I was preparing the alu chaat, I am flown back to the stall just outside my school, and how I craved for the last bell to ring. I have had alu chaats in many different places, but still when I pass by that chaatwala I stop to commit the sin of having the same old alu chaat. Today my post is a tribute to the good times I spent with my friends in front of the chaat stall and the fear of getting caught by mom.

Serves: 4


Potato (Alu): 2 large sizes

Onion (Peyaj): 1 medium size

Roasted cumin powder (Jeera guro): 1 teaspoon

Red Chili Powder (Sukhno Lankar guro): 1 teaspoon

Green chili (Kacha Lanka): 2-3

Chickpea (Chana Dal): 1 tablespoon

Coriander leaves (Dhane pata) for garnishing

Salt to taste


  • Soak the chickpeas overnight, or for more than 6 to 7 hours.
  • Boil the potatoes without taking out the peel. Alternately you can also bake it in a microwave oven for 12 minutes.
  • After the potatoes are boiled properly, see to it that they are not over boiled, take out the peels and chop them into 1” length pieces
  • Chop the onions very finely, the chilies in small rings
  • Add all spices along with the onions, green chili and salt; mix well
  • Throw in the chickpeas and tamarind paste, toss it so that it gets evenly mixed
  • Garnish with coriander leaves and serve
Alu Kabli

Alu Kabli

Alu chaat is a favorite among all age groups. Serve it over an evening chit chatting. Look for more updates here, till then Happy Cooking and Happy Eating.

Sending this to Original Recipes – Monthly Round-Up Event.


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