Strawberries and Cream Cheese French Roll Up Toast

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I am a big proponent of breakfast. I love to pamper myself with large lavish breakfast, so whenever I travel my first criterion to choose a hotel is they have a good breakfast bar. My choice for breakfast always include bread and eggs and when they come together there nothing stopping me. Be it the humble bread butter with a side of poached eggs or the Indian style spicy French toast – I love them all. So, when I saw this photo on Pinterest for a French toast roll up, I just had to have it.

I used cream cheese and strawberries for the filling, but to say the least, the options are unending. You can try it with cream cheese and chocolate chips, or nutella and raspberries or the American favorite peanut butter and jam.

Try out these easy to make French roll ups and comment on what you used for the filling.

French Roll Up

 

Strawberries and Cream Cheese French Roll Up Toast
Serves 2
Print
Prep Time
5 min
Cook Time
5 min
Prep Time
5 min
Cook Time
5 min
Ingredients
  1. 6 large sandwich bread
  2. 2 large eggs
  3. 4-5 strawberries, hulled and cut to bite size pieces
  4. 6 tablespoon cream cheese
  5. 1 teaspoon cinnamon powder
  6. ½ cup refined sugar
  7. Cooking spray for frying
Instructions
  1. Take the crust out of the breads, and flatten them with a rolling pin. Beat the eggs in a spread out bowl
  2. To one side of the bread spread the cream cheese and top it with a good amount of strawberries
  3. Mix the cinnamon powder with the sugar and spread on a plate. Spray the cooking oil on a frying pan
  4. Roll the bread, and dip in the beaten eggs and place the rolled up bread on the frying pan.
  5. Fry the roll up till they are golden brown on all sides, roll on the cinnamon sugar and serve immediately
Cook like a Bong http://bengalicuisine.net/

Cream cheese and Strawberries French Roll Up

Manhattan Cart Style Chicken Over Rice

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Though I have been calling Texas my home for the last 3 years, I got the chance to live in Big Apple for sometime. I may sound cliche, but living 2 blocks away from Times Square was like a dream come true. Raised in Kolkata, I’m used to the noise, dirt and crowd of cities. Probably, thats one of the reasons why NYC became so close to my heart.

Just as you step into the streets of Manhattan, there is so much to see and do – that you feel like getting lost in those streets. NYC has its own charm. The city has a lot to offer, and talking about food, no city in US and probably in the world has so much variety than Manhattan. From $500 pre fixe menus to $5 meals – Manhattan has it all.

If you are in New York city and want to grab a quick bite without burning a hole in your pocket, the carts on the streets of Manhattan is your answer. There are hundreds of carts selling tens of different type of food – from gyros to pretzels. One such cart, one of my most favorite cart food is on the intersection of Broadway and 39th street. This Bangladeshi guys offers the best chicken over rice in all of Manhattan.

As the name suggests, the menu is simple – bite size pieces of chicken cooked in mild spices served over a bed of flavored Basmati rice with a side of salads and your choice of sauce poured to make this meal a class apart.

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Quick And Easy Khichdi

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Being lazy and hungry is a tough call. You want to eat something wholesome, yet you are too lazy to cook a full course meal. Khichudi is the answer to such situations. A full bowl of khichudi is a life saver during such times.

This quick and easy khichudi recipe is kid friendly and you can adjust the spices according to your whim. Pour extra water if you want the khichdi to be runny.

Winter Khichudi

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Panch Phoron – A Tale of Five Spices and a City

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I cant believe its already five weeks into 2014. I had been away from the blogging world for quite sometime now, and even though I wanted to write a post, I was too busy even to think about what to post. So anyways I’m back now, and have loads to share. In between my break I went to Kolkata after a long long time. As expected there are new constructions everywhere and the traffic, I just don’t want to talk about it – it seems people have gone crazier on the roads. Though I missed out on Book Fair 2014, but got to visit a lot many other fairs. And, believe it or not there was this fair, Baro bhuter mela (you can loosely transalte it to the Fair of 12 ghosts), okay actually they are not ghosts, but a group of sadhus who come to this place and stay their for a week after Sankranti. So, the crazy part of this fair was not the thousands of people in it but the free eggs. Yes, you heard it right, these sadhus worship a goddess whose the offering is duck egg. After the puja, the eggs are distributed among the locals and there are like hundreds of eggs, and thousands of people in line to get those eggs. It was crazy, but it was really fun to watch such a chaos.

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Durga Puja 2013 Timtable and Kalakand in Microwave

Subho Shashthi

Durga puja has already started. As Bengal gets decked up with all the pandals and the puja shopping almost come to an end, I on the other hand, living thousands of miles away is waiting for this weekend to arrive. The Durga puja in the US is held during weekends just for the convenience of the attendees.

While I miss on my dose of the Kolkata Durga pooja fever, I’m getting ready to celebrate the US style Durga puja. I will definitely miss the phuchka, alu kabli, churmur, ghugni – oh I cant stop writing the list of road side food that I’ll be missing on this puja – but would have a new taste, a new experience of celebrating puja just over the weekend.

The street food on Kolkata adds an added charm to the whole flavor of Durga puja, but there is always the home cooked prasad. Though my family strictly becomes vegetarian during the four days of puja, mainly because of the fact we have our own durga idol at home, and she has been worshiped in the family for more than a century now. And, as Ma Durga is bid adieu, the next day, ekdashi is the day to eat fish and only fish. The entire family with brothers, sisters, cousins, their spouses, their kids – you know how the Indian family tree is – eats, sitting on the floor. Last year I was heading the frying department of the lunch, mostly because my mom felt her daughter is old enough to get married so she is old enough to cook for hundred people, or at least the dal and bhaja part. So, my task for last ekdashi was to make loitta macher vada for the entire family. It was intimidating, it was tiring, yet there was a satisfaction seeing everybody asking for more.

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Kadhi – Spicy Indian Yogurt Soup

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Stop me if I’m wrong, but in Indian cuisines, and by Indian cuisine I mean cuisines from all parts of the country, there are very few recipes which can be considered as soup. Kadhi, is one of those few dishes that can be considered as soup. You can have it warm and serve it with khichdi or cold as a soup.

Kadhi is a true Indian dish, I say this because, almost the same recipe is followed throughout India. The wiki page on kadhi says that its a Gujrati dish and is popular among people in the Northern states and also among Sindhis. But, while living in the Southern states of India I have had kadhi with the South Indian touch of tempered curry leaves.

Gujrati Kadhi

Gujratis, as I have learnt over the years love their sweets, so even in kadhis they like to add some sugar or jaggery to give it a hint of sweetness. Sindhis like some vegetables in the kadhi, the most popular being okra. Another very common kadhi preparation is kadhi with pakora. The pakoras are made by frying a batter of chickpea and onions, and are dropped in the kadhi.

Growing up in a Bengali family, I had my share of having kadhi for lunch in the summer. My mom used to, actually she still makes sour yogurt at home, everyday all through the year. And, when there is some extra yogurt left she makes the kadhi, but with a touch of Bengali spices in it.

Kadhi

Appetizer, Indian, Yogurt soup, Gujrati kadhi, Kadhi, Indian recipe, Indian spicy yogurt soup, Summer recipe
Cooks in    Serves 4
Ingredients
  • 1 cup sour yogurt
  • 3 tablespoon chickpea flour
  • ½ teaspoon ginger paste
  • 1 teaspoon turmeric powder
  • ½ teaspoon chili powder
  • 3 cups water
  • Salt to taste
  • For tempering:
  • 1 tablespoon mustard oil
  • ½ teaspoon black mustard seeds
  • 10-12 curry leaves
  • 2-3 whole dry red chilies
Directions
  • Take the yogurt is a large bowl and gradually add the chickpea flour to it, mix well so that there are no lumps. Pour the water a cup or less at a time and continue stirring. You can also add everything together and put it in a juicer for 10 seconds to get a good mix
  • Add all the ground spices and season with salt. Give it a good stir
  • Heat the oil in a saucepan, add the mustard seeds, as they start sputtering add the curry leaves and whole red chilies. Pour the yogurt mixture and cook till it just starts to boil. Lower the flame and cook for a minute more. Serve hot or cold.

Kadhi

Hot Tips – Be patient while mixing the ingredients together, mix well so that there are no lumps. It depends on how thick you want your kadhi you can add or reduce the amount of water, also note that that the kadhi thickens after cooling.

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Kashmiri Dum Aloo

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Even though diabetes is spreading like a plague in India and especially in the Eastern part, we Bengalis are yet to leave the habit of using potatoes. Be that macher jhol-e aloo (potatoes in fish curry) or a simple aloo chokha (mashed potatoes with onion and pepper) potatoes are everywhere. Even though half my family have to take either insulin shots or pills, I couldn’t leave out potatoes from my diet. Potatoes are an integral part of Bengali cuisine.

A Sunday breakfast is never complete without a dose of luchi (fried Indian bread) and aloor dum. And, when it comes to talking about potatoes in Bengali recipes leaving out the oh-so-soft potatoes in mangsher jhol (goat curry) will be like blasphemy. Potatoes are everywhere in Bangali ranna, we like them in almost all our dishes and the aloo posto is a signature dish of Bengal.

Kashmiri Aloo Dum

While other Indian communities do not use potatoes so much, I came across this recipe in a very old cooking magazine long time back. I have searched for Kashmiri recipes for alu dum, but they were all very different. I main reason why I chose to use this old recipe was because they used poppy paste – one of my favorite spices in the kitchen. People from Kashmir are voracious meat eaters and owe them for inventing the famous rogan josh. There are also vegetarian recipes available in Kashmiri cuisine and this aloo dum is one of my favorites.

Kashmiri Dum Aloo

Indian, Side, Potato, Kashmiri cuisine, Kashmiri alu dum, Aloo dum, Kashmir recipe
Cooks in    Serves 4
Ingredients
  • 1 lb baby potatoes
  • 1 medium onion made to paste
  • 1 teaspoon turmeric powder
  • 1 teaspoon chili powder
  • 1 tablespoon cumin powder
  • 1 tablespoon coriander powder
  • 1 tablespoon ginger garlic paste
  • 1/4 cup poppy seed paste
  • 3 tablespoon cashew paste
  • 4 tablespoons sunflower oil
  • Salt to taste
  • 1 teaspoon garam masala
  • Handful of soaked raisins (optional)
Directions
  • Wash the potatoes and boil with peeling the skin for 7 to 10 minutes or till they are almost cooked.
  • Drain the water and let them come to a temperature where you can touch. Peel the potatoes. Sprinle a pinch of turmeric and salt
  • Heat half the oil in a thick bottom vessel and lightly fry the potatoes till there are a few blisters on them.
  • Take out, and keep over a kitchen towel to drain the excess oil
  • Pour in the extra oil and heat. Add the onion paste and fry till the onion is fragrant and oil starts separating. Add all the powdered spices, ginger garlic paste and fry for a minute. Add the potatoes and toss well to coat the spices. Season with salt.
  • Cook while stirring in between till the spices change to a darker color. Pour water and cook till the potatoes are almost done.
  • Add the poppy and cashew paste and cook for 4 to 5 minutes more. Sprinkle the ground garam masala and the raisins if using. Serve hot with chapati or white rice.

Aloo dum

Hot Tips – You can also use large potatoes instead of the baby ones. Cut them in quarters and follow the same instructions. I have used ordinary chili powder to have a more spicier taste, but you can also use Kashmiri red chili powder. The Kashmiri chili powder gives an extra color to the recipe and unlike other peppers it is less hot.

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Chittagong Chicken

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My connection to Chittagong and that of Bangladesh is that my grandparents lived half their lives in the land. Both my parents were born and brought up in Kolkata and so we never had the chance to visit our city of origin.

Chittagong chicken

Growing up, I have heard my father speaking to his sibling is Chatgaiyya bhasa (Chittagong language), but I still can’t figure out what they say :). The language may be as hard as learning Mandarin to me, but I have heard storied from my grandfather about the beautiful beaches and the picturesque countryside and I wish to visit it someday. As, for now I am happy with the rich and spicy dish this port city of Bangladesh has to offer – the morichut and of course the shutki maach.

While looking for a new chicken recipe last week, I came across this Chittagong chicken recipe. Though while growing up I have had quite a few different type of Chittagong recipes, but never had the chance to have this chicken dish – probably because of the fact that chicken was a no-no till the time my grandfather was around.

Ground Spice

The recipe asked for marinading the chicken in roasted ground cilantro seeds and dry red chilies. While roasting the two spices, I was so overjoyed with the flavor that loomed my kitchen, that I just couldn’t wait to taste the chicken. I deviated a little from the original recipe – added a few potatoes and kept the gravy a little runny – because that’s how my man likes his Sunday chicken.

Ingredients

  • 2lbs medium size chicken pieces
  • 2 large potatoes, cut into half
  • ½ of an onion, slivered finely
  • ½ onion made to a paste
  • 6 dry red chilies
  • 2 tablespoon whole cilantro seeds
  • 1 teaspoon Kashmiri red chili powder
  • 2 tablespoon garlic paste
  • 1 teaspoon turmeric powder
  • 1/4  tablespoon cashew paste
  • 4 tablespoon mustard oil
  • 1 teaspoon garam masala
  • Salt to taste
  • Warm water

 

Directions

  • Dry roast 4 red chilies and the whole cilantro seeds; grind them in a spice grinder.
  • Put the chicken in a large glass bowl, add half of the roasted spices, and 1 tablespoon garlic paste massage the chicken with it. Add half the turmeric, little salt and about 1 tablespoon of mustard oil. Cover with a plastic wrap and marinate for at least an hour or keep it in the bottom rack of the fridge overnight.
  • If you have kept the chicken in the fridge, take it out well before you start cooking so that it comes down to room temperature.
  • Heat oil in the wok. Add a pinch of turmeric and salt to the potatoes and fry in the oil till they turn slightly brown in a few places. Take out and keep aside.
  • In the left over oil add the slivered onions and the 2 red chiles and fry till they turn light brown. Add the chicken, onion paste, turmeric, chili powder, garlic paste and stir well to mix all the spices well. Season with salt.
  • Let the chicken cook over high flame, till the spices turn darker in color. Keep stirring so that it doesn’t stick to the bottom of the pan.
  • Pour about 2 cups of warm water to the chicken, and add the fried potatoes. Cook covered till the chicken is cooked and potatoes are soft. Add the cashew paste and cook for a minute.
  • Sprinkle the extra dry ground spices and garam masala. Serve with roti or rice.

Sunday chicken curry from Chittagong

Hot Tips – Don’t worry about the heat from the chilies, it is much reduced by the cashew paste and also by using the Kashmiri red chili powder, the color turns good and the heat is also less.

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Sunday Mutton Curry

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The grandfather clock on the old living room wall just stopped striking 11. Its a lazy Sunday morning and you’ve just finished your Sunday breakfast with luchi, cholar dal and sandesh. Already the dining room is filled with the smell of kasha mangsho from the kitchen. Now, this feels like a dream. The special meals of Sunday will always be missed, now that I’m thousands of miles away from home.

Pathar mangsho (goat meat) can easily be classified as a comfort food as well as an exotic Bengali dish. Some would say, why such a rich and spicy food be called comfort food. The answer is in the meal, garam garam bhaat (warm white rice) with pathar mangsho (mutton curry) and a slice of gandoraj lebu (lime)– do you want anything else from this world?

Goat Curry

Kolkata is always related to the wonderful rasogolla and sandesh it has produced for more than a century now. But, Kolkata is also famous for its goat meat curry. The mutton curry from Shyambazar’s Golbari is one of the best, or probably the best mutton preparation you can ever have. The rich and spicy dark mutton curry can easily be the highlight of your week.

Previously I had quite a disappointing result prearing mutton. Either it turned out chewy, and the second time I was engrossed in my TV series, and the mutton got burnt to the point where I had to use a knife to scrap out the pieces from the vessel. So, this time anxious and determined I set to prepare mutton. I marinated the mutton overnight and slow cooked it for almost a couple of hours. The results was just awesome!

Sunday Mutton Curry

Indian, Side, Comfort food, Bengali recipe, Authentic bengali recipe, Bengali cuisine, Mutton curry, Goat meat, Bengali mutton curry, Sunday mutton curry, Bangla recipe
Cooks in    Serves 4
Ingredients
  • 2 lb goat meat
  • For the marinade -
  • ¼ cup sour yogurt
  • 1 medium size onion, made to paste
  • 1 teaspoon cumin powder
  • 1 teaspoon chili powder
  • 1 teaspoon turmeric powder
  • 1 teaspoon dhaniya powder
  • 1 tablespoon ginger paste
  • 1 tablespoon garlic paste
  • 2 tablespoon mustard oil
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • For the gravy -
  • ½ cup grated raw papaya
  • ½ medium size onion, slivered lengthwise
  • 1 big size potato cut to quarters
  • 1 teaspoon cumin powder
  • 1 teaspoon chili powder
  • 1 teaspoon turmeric powder
  • 1 teaspoon dhaniya powder
  • 1 tablespoon ginger paste
  • 1 tablespoon garlic paste
  • ½ teaspoon granulated sugar
  • 3 tablespoon mustard oil
  • Salt to taste
  • Warm water
Directions
  • Mix all the ingredients except the turmeric, oil and salt of the marinade in a large glass bowl. Add the washed mutton pieces, and using your hand, coat the marinade evenly over the mutton. Add the turmeric and salt and give it another round of mixing. Pour the oil. Cover the bowl with a kiln film and marinate for at least 4 hours or you can also keep it overnight. Place it in the lower rack of your refrigerator
  • Take out the mutton about an hour before yous start cooking, and bring it to normal temperature.
  • Heat oil in a large wok. Coat the potatoes with a pinch of turmeric and salt and fry in that oil till the potatoes start to brown in places. Take the potatoes out and reserve for later.
  • Put in the slivered onions in the same oil and saute till they start wilting. Add the sugar and fry till the onions are caramelized. Now, add the marinated mutton and stir to coat with the oil and onions. Add all the spices and grated papaya and give it a good stir.
  • Increase the flame to high, and start reducing the marinade, stirring frequently. Make sure that the marinade doesn\'t stick to the bottom of the wok. The marinade will start to change color to a darker shade and so will the mutton.
  • Once the marinade is almost dry and dark, pour in 2 cups of warm water and cover the wok with a lid. At this point, you can also transfer the mutton in a pressure cooker, and cook in it.
  • If you are not using a pressure cooker, lower the flame to low and slow cook for almost 1 to 11/2 hour. Check in between.
  • Depending upon the mutton, the cooking time varies. Pour warm water as and when required. Once, the mutton is half cooked, add the potatoes and cook till the potatoes are done.
  • Serve hot with warm white rice or luchi.

Golbarir Mangsho

Hot Tips – Mixing turmeric and salt together with the other spices in the marinade makes the mutton harder and it becomes a chewy when cooked. Papain, the enzyme release from raw papaya help to cook the mutton and make it softer. Also, the grated papaya gives an extra thickness to the gravy. The trick to cook mutton is to cook it over low flame.

Other LinksMutton Curry from eCurry, Railway mutton curry from BongMom

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