Rogan Josh Review and Giveaway

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Rogan josh is one of the most popular recipes of the Kashmiri cuisine, though its origin is from the Persian kitchen. It is mainly made with lamb or mutton, but nowadays even chicken or vegetarian versions are also available in the restaurants. This recipe is characterized by its brilliant red color. The Kashmiri red chili powder is mainly used to get this red color, but in traditional version of the recipe dried flowers or roots of Alkanet is also used and even saffron strands.

Saffron Road Food had sent me some of their simmer sauces to try out, and a rogan josh simmer sauce was one of them. The recipe was written in details, and was very easy to make. I made it with boneless chicken and put in some veggies – carrots, potatoes and bell pepper in it too. To make this rogan josh all I had to do was to fry the washed boneless chicken pieces in oil till they were soft, put in the thinly sliced vegetables and toss for 2-3 minutes. Then just added the simmer sauce and let it cook for 4-5 minutes more and that it restaurant style rogan josh was ready in less than 15 minutes.

Rogan Josh on plate

Most simmer sauces from other companies, which I have tried contains their own signature smell, probably because of a particular ingredient in them, but the simmer sauces from Saffron Road Food was perfect and the finished product tasted just like it should taste if you had made it from scratch. They also have simmer sauces for Mororccan Tagine, Tikka Masala and Lemongrass Basil and they were equally good. These simmer sauces are perfect for bachelors, who have no idea where to start from in the kitchen and also for families for a busy week night or a lazy weekend.

I am very glad to announce that Saffron Road Food has agreed to sponsor this month’s giveaway. All the 4 simmer sauces can be yours. Just follow the rules below and two lucky winners will receive 4 different simmer sauces from Saffron Road Food.

Giveaway Logo

Rules for the giveaway:

1. Eligible to all legal residents of USA. 
2. Visit the Saffron Road Food website and leave a comment here saying which product you loved most. 
3. Like Saffron Road Food and Cook Like a Bong Facebook pages if you have not already liked it. 
 

I will use a random number generator to choose two winners from those who have commented in this post.

Here’s my take on rogan josh.

Rogan Josh

Indian, Side, Chicken curry, Rohan josh, Kashmiri style rogan josh
Cooks in    Serves 6
Ingredients
  • 2 lbs lamb or mutton
  • 1/4 cup whole milk yogurt
  • 2 teaspoon Kashmiri red chili powder
  • 2 tablespoon ginger garlic paste
  • 5 cardamom pods
  • 6-8 whole cloves
  • 2 bay leaves
  • 1 mace
  • 1 medium size onion, made to paste
  • 4-5 garlic cloves
  • 1 teaspoon garam masala
  • 5 tablespoon canola oil
  • Salt to taste
Directions
  • Mix the lamb or mutton with yogurt, ginger garlic paste, onion paste, red chili powder, and salt. Mix well, put in a ziplock pouch and keep in the refrigerator for atleast 2 hours and not more than 8 hours.
  • Heat oil in a thick bottom wok, add the garlic cloves,whole spices and the marinaded lamb or mutton. Fry till the spices change to a darker color and the marinade dries out. Keep stirring so that it doesn\'t stick to the bottom
  • Reduce the flame to medium, pour in 2 cups of warm water and simmer for 45minutes, or transfer to a pressure cooker and wait till two whistles.
  • Wait till you attain the deserve consistency of the gravy, add more water if required. Sprinkle the garam masala and serve hot with basmati rice or naan.

Rogan Josh with kadai

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Holi – The Festival of Colors Event RoundUp

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Holi is one of largest and probably the most exhilarating festivals in India. Though a Hindu religious festival, Holi is played by almost all communities and it is the festival of colors. It is to celebrate the arrival of spring and also for the good harvest. People throw colored powder and water at each other, the entire country gets immersed in colors of joy.

It is the festival of colors. This year, Holi will be celebrated on March 27, 2013. So, to be a part of this colorful festival we ta Cook Like a Bong hosted Holi – The Festival of Colors event. The event was sponsored by CupoNation, and two lucky winners will get Flipkart gift vouchers worth 1000 and 500 INR.

Giveaway Gallery

How can an Indian festival go by without mentioning food. So, that here’s how I came up with the idea to host an event for food for Holi. The event theme was to prepare a dish inspired by the Holi festival and to portray the different colors in the plate. We received loads of recipes from many bloggers and non-bloggers from all over the world. You can see the entries below. Scroll down further to know who the lucky winners.

Click on each of the images to navigate to the recipe pages.

[catablog_gallery id=”3814″  template=”gallery”]

The post from non-blogger, Anu are here:

Bread Gulab Jamun

Bread Gulab Jamun Recipe
Dessert, Indian
  
Ingredients
  • *Bread-6 slices(brown part removed)
  • *milk-5 or 6 tablsp
  • *cardamom-5
  • *sugar-half cup
  • *water-1 cup
  • *almonds/cashews(optional)
  • *oil
Directions
  • >Mix bread and milk to a consistency so that u can roll balls from it...If U want U can make bread to small crumbs 1st.dough should not be soggy
  • >make small balls,fry them in oil or ghee
  • >Boil water,sugar and crushed cardamom till it become syrup(dont make it too thick,once it cools it will get more thicker)
  • >remove syrup from heat,allow to cool,then add bread balls
  • >atleast keep it for 1hr,or refrigerate,garnish with thinly sliced almonds

Choco Cup Icecream

Choco Cup Icecream Recipe
Dessert, Indian
  
Ingredients
  • Disposable glass
  • *chocolate
  • *ice cream or whipping cream
  • *nuts,biscut crumbs,fruits or wafers...
Directions
  • Melt chocolate by double boiling or in oven
  • Pour to glass and spread evenly with a brush or spoon
  • Keep in freezer for at least 1 hr and make sure it is hardened enough before you take it out
  • With a knife,carefully separate glass and chocolate,again keep in fridge
  • By this time you can prepare filling, either ice cream or whipping cream
  • Fill your cup with anything of UR choice(nuts or biscuit) and finally top it up with ice cream

And, here are the winners for the Flipkart vouchers sponsored by  CupoNation.

1. Vijaylakshmi of Virunthu unna vaanga

2. Saraniya of Sara’s tasty buds

Both of you please send me an email to bengalicuisne[at]gmail[dot]com so that I can send you the vouchers.

 Thanks to all those who shared your wonderful recipes for this event.

  If you like this post, please consider linking to it or sharing it with others. I’ll love to hear your comments too.You can also Subscribe to BengaliCuisine by Email, or Subscribe in a reader

Announcing Holi – The Festival of Colors Event and Giveaway

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Holi is the festival of colors. It is a religious festival of the Hindus and is majorly played among the Hindu communities all over the world; it’s a day for your inner child to come out. It is observed as a national festival in India, Nepal and the neighboring countries.

The earliest mention of observing Holi can be dated back to the 7th century Sanskrit drama, Ratnavali. People gather scrap wood, and other substances to burn in a large bonfire on the evening prior to Holi celebration. Back in my school days, burir ghaur porano (the bonfire) was such a rage that me and my cousins used to start collecting wood almost a week before the day.

The festival of color as the name rightly suggests is more of a game than a ritual, unlike all other Hindu rituals and customs. It is all about playing with colors on that day, spraying colors at one another. And, of course the hour long shower to rub off all those colors.

A Hindu festival without food is almost impossible. Fried snacks and sweets are all on the menu. My maternal aunt used to observe Gopal pujo (worshipping Lord Krishna), and so the chaler payesh was something to never miss.

This year even though I am miles away from playing holi with my family, I thought of enjoying with you all. So, announcing Holi – The Festival of Colors event. Blog about your favorite Holi food and share it with us.

This time your work will be awarded. The two best recipes will receive 1000 INR and 500 INR e-gift voucher from Flipkart. The prizes are sponsored by CupoNation. CupoNation is India’s largest coupon portal offering the newest deals and promotions from great brands in India. Make sure to check their website if you want to buy something online in India, they really have great deals from almost all major online traders in India.

Holi - The Festival of Colors Event Logo

Rules of Holi – The Festival of Colors event:

Bloggers –

  1. Blog about your favorite Holi food that you love to prepare during Holi, link back to this event announcement mentioning the giveaway sponsored by CupoNation  and please use the event logo
  2. Submit your links and other details in the following form

Submission form [vfb id=1]

or send in a mail with the following details to bengalicuisine[at]gmail[dot]com

             i.Name
           ii.Blog Name
           iii. Blog URL
           iv. Recipe Name
           v.Recipe URL
           vi. Photo of the prepared recipe
  1. Last date of submitting your entries is March 10, 2013 12 midnight PST. I’ll be posting the event round-up along with the names of the winners before Holi, March 27, 2013.
  2. If you want to send any archived entries please update it with a link to this event announcement post.
  3. There is no limit to the number of recipes you send. So, send as many as you want and increase your chances to win the awards.

 

Non-Bloggers –

  1. Please send in your recipes to bengalicuisine[at]gmail[dot]com along with the photo of the prepared dish
  2. I’ll post these recipes in our blog, Cook Like a Bong as guest posts with due credit to you and add these links to the round.

 If you like this post, please consider linking to it or sharing it with others. I’ll love to hear your comments too.You can also Subscribe to BengaliCuisine by Email, or Subscribe in a reader

Christmas Baking Event RoundUp

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Holidays are in the air. And, what better way to celebrate this holiday season with some wonderful baked goods from your oven for your loved ones. Put on your oven mitts and get ready for a great  collection of Christmas baking recipes.

Thank you all for the lovely entries that you sent for the Christmas Event 2012. Here’s the round-up.

Amrita _ Eggless Whole Wheat Dinner rolls

Eggless Whole Wheat Dinner rolls from Sweet’n’Savoury by Amrita

Sharmistha_fish_cabbage

Baked Fish (Bhetki) on a bed of grated Cabbage  from CookaDoodledo by SGD
Priya_Eggless Banana Muffins

Eggless Banana Muffins from Enveetu Kitchen by Priya Srinivasan

 Apple crumble

Apple Pear Crumble from Confusion Cook by Deepali Jain
Deepika_Cake Pops

Cake Pops from My Life & Spice by Deepika

Classic Cupcake

Classic cupcakes from Ghar Ka Khana by Sheelu

Eggless Molten Lava Cake

Eggless Molten Lava Cake from Nivedhanams by Sowmya

chicken roast

Roast Chicken on a bed of vegetables, served with butter rice from

COOK-A-DOODLE-DO by SGD

banana cake

Banana Cake from COOK-A-DOODLE-DO by SGD

Priya_Chocolate Black Pepper Sable

Chocolate Black Pepper Sable from Enveetu Kitchen by Priya Srinivasan

Rasgulla Blackforest Cake

Rasgulla Blackforest Cake from Desi Fiesta by Manjula

Eggless Cappuccino Biscotti

Eggless Cappuccino Biscotti from Confusion Cook by Deepali

Brownie Tart

Brownie tart with chocolate pockets from Sweet’n’Savoury by Amrita

Elbow Pasta Tart

Elbow Pasta Tart  from Confusion Cook by Deepali

 Eggless chocolate beetroot cake

Eggless Chocolate Beetroot Cake with Chocolate Lacquer Glaze

 from Confusion Cook by Deepali

Mini Apple Pie

Mini Apple pie from Cook Like a Bong by Sudeshna and Kalyan

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Announcing Christmas Event

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I studied in a convent school, so Christmas was a big thing. I remember the whole week before the school closed for winter vacation we had to give gifts to the slums nearby. The gifts included food, soaps and also our old clothes. We decorated the entire school with streamers, light bulbs and there was the big manger decorated in front of the chapel. And, at the end of all these work there was the big piece of cake waiting.
So many years have passed, but I still miss school during this time of the year. So, this year I thought of celebrating along with you guys. Here I am announcing the Christmas event 2012. The theme for this event is as you have already guessed is Christmas. You can send any recipe that you would want to share with us, preferably a baked recipe – cakes, pies, breads.

There is no limit to the number of recipes you can send  for the event. Just send the recipes along with a photo of the preparation (the photo should not be more than 100Kb).  Send in your entries to bengalicuisine[at]gmail[dot]com with the subject  “Entry for Christmas Event 2012” along with the following details:

Name of author:
Name of the recipe:
Name of the blog:
URL of the blog:
Attach the picture with the mail

You can add the logo in your post or also on your sidebar. Send in new recipes or archived recipes. If you are sending any old recipes please update the post with the link to this event announcement.

Those who don’t have a blog please send in your recipe in word document format.
You can send in your entries from today till December 15, 12 midnight PST. I will post the round-up before Christmas.

Wish you all a Merry Christmas in advance. 

Want to stay connected, please consider linking to it or sharing it with others. I’ll love to hear your comments too.
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Inviting recipes for Father’s Day – Contest

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The urban dictionary defines the word “Father” as the guy who criticizes you for everything you do, and never admits that he is wrong. But whether you admit it or not, fathers’ are the best support. He was there during your first knee bruise, your first breakup and even to celebrate your graduation.  And, of course fathers are the ATMs (read, all-time money). It’s just a month left to celebrate a day for this awesome man. Father’s day is generally celebrated on the third Sunday of June in some countries and in other dates in the different parts of the world.

It would be interesting to know how Father’s Day came into practice and celebrated worldwide with an equal sincerity and respect as any other significant holidays. Here’s a short history on the holiday, and meaning of the different colors of roses to be worn that Day. You may even refer the page to others to share the information by clicking on the link given below.

About 4,000 years ago a young boy named Elmusu wished his Babylonian father good health and a long life by carving a Father’s Day message on a card made out of clay. No one knows what happened to Elmesu or his father, but the tradition of having a special day honoring fathers has continued through the years in countries across the world.

The Countries, where the Catholic Church were of significant influence on the culture of the society, Father’s Day is celebrated on St. Joseph’s Day (March 19). However, a more secular celebration which is not associated with any religion is followed in recent times to highlight the increased diversity among people from all over the globe coexisting together in one place.

Father’s Day is celebrated popularly on 3rd Sunday in June in many parts of the world. The idea for creating a day for children to honor their fathers began in Spokane, Washington. A woman by the name of Sonora Smart Dodd thought of the idea for Father’s Day while listening to a Mother’s Day sermon in 1909. Having been raised by her father, Henry Jackson Smart, after her mother died, Sonora wanted her father to know how special he was to her. It was her father that made all the parental sacrifices and was, in the eyes of his daughter, a courageous, selfless, and loving man. Sonora’s father was born in June, so she chose to hold the first Father’s Day celebration in Spokane, Washington on the 19th of June, 1910.

In 1924 President Calvin Coolidge proclaimed the third Sunday in June as Father’s Day. President Nixon, in 1972, established a permanent national observance of Father’s Day to be held on the third Sunday of June. So Father’s Day was born as a token of love and gratitude that a daughter cherishes for her beloved father. Roses are the Father’s Day flowers: red to be worn for a living father and white if the father has died.

Just a month to go for Father’s Day and we at Cook Like a Bong are here to celebrate with you all. Send in your dad’s favorite recipes, your stories about your father, and any gift ideas for the day, or just send a photo of yours with your father – we’ll publish here on Father’s Day (19th June, 2011).

Blogger friends can write about it in your blog adding a link to this post, and we’ll be happy if you use this logo in your posts. Non-bloggers can send in your entries directly to us as a .doc file. The image size must be less than 80Kb.

Send in your entries to bengalicuisine[at]gmail[dot]com with the subject line  “Father’s Day entry”. The last date for sending your entries is midnight 15th June PST. The best entry will win a surprise gift from Cook Like a Bong.

Mention your

  • Name:
  • Blog Name:
  • Type of entry: Recipe/Stories/Gift Ideas/Photos
  • Blog URL:
  • Post URL:
  • Attach the photo along with the mail.
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Event Roundup – Tried and Tasted Recipes

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All thanks to Lakshmi and Mallika Basu for this wonderful event. The event was originally started by Zlamuska and now carried on by Lakshmi of Kitchen Chronicles. All my thanks to Lakshmi for letting me host this event. And, of course a many thanks to Mallika for letting us borrow her recipes. She is the proud author of Miss Masala (you can get the book from Flipkart and Amazon). Here’s the list of entries for this wonderful event:

Ksenia of Tales of a Spoon has sent us a Jeera aloo recipe.

The Goan Prawn Masala recipe comes from Swetha of Our Cherished World and the Goan Shrimp Masala from Denny of Oh Taste n See.

Talking about the most prized possession of the Bengali culinary art, Kankana Saxena of Sunshine & Smile has shared the recipe for Fish Curry in Bengali Style

How can we neglect the harvest of the winter season, Gobhi Matar comes from Anamika of Taste Junction.

Curry Leaf of TastyCurryLeaf has shared the recipe for Tamatar Shorba.

To end with a sweet note, here’s Usha of MySpicKitchen sharing the recipe for Bhapa Doi, Bengali Cheese Cake

You can find the original links to Mallika’s Quick and Easy Indian Cooking blog down here:

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Event Announcement: Tried and Tasted Recipes

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I am very honored to declare that Cook Like a Bong will be hosting this month’s Tried and Tasted event. The event was originally started by Zlamuska and now carried on by Lakshmi of Kitchen Chronicles. All my thanks to Lakshmi for letting me host this event.

For this edition of the event, we have chosen the Quick Indian Cooking blog. The blog is hosted by a very dear lady, Mallika Basu. Mallika started this blog back in September 2006 and had been spreading the spices and charms of Indian cuisine since then. You can choose from a variety of recipes from her blog including vegetarian, fish, chicken, and mutton recipes. She also is the proud author of Miss Masala (you can get the book from Flipkart and Amazon).

The rules are simple:

1. Cook any recipe from Mallika’s Quick Indian Cooking and post about it. Stay as true to the original recipe(s) as possible. Therefore, there is no need for re-posting it, simply link to the original post.
2. There is no time-frame for the original recipe. It can be as old as my grand-mother or new ones.
3.Have you cooked from Blog of the month before? As this event is all about tasting and reflecting on the taste, older posts are also welcome. Simply link to this post and mention T&T event.

4. Link your post to this announcement and to the Lakshmi’s post . Please always link to both sites, so both blogs are given credit and you are avoiding copyright issues. We would love to see the event logo on your post.

5. Send an e-mail to bengalicuisine[at]gmail[dot]com with the following details-

  • Your name
  • Name of your blog
  • Recipe name
  • Your post URL as well as the original URL
  • A picture (300px by height, please).

6. The last date for entries is January 20, 2011 and the round up will be posted within a week.

7. Non-bloggers are more than welcome to participate. Simply e-mail me with your experience of what you cooked and if possible please include a picture.

A special thanks to Ksenia for creating our Logo each and every month.

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Cooking with Seeds – Poppy: Event Round-up Addendum

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In addition to the entries listed for the Cooking with Seeds – Poppy event, here’s some more.

Biscuits with dates from Jayasri of Samayal Arai

Aloo Posto (Potatoes in Poppy Seeds Paste) from Arundhati of  My Saffron Kitchen

White Vegetable Korma from Denny of  Oh Taste n See

And, last but not the least an entry from a non-blogger friend, Subit Datta. I am writing the recipe for Papaya with Poppy Seeds here.

1. Grate a small papaya.

2. Make two tablespoon poppy seeds into paste with 1/2 green chillies.

3. Heat  one and a half tablespoon vegetable oil in a non-stick pan.

4. Put in 1/2 teaspoon onion seeds (kalojeerey).

5. Add grated papaya. Add salt. Cover and cook.

6. Add poppy seed paste. Keep stirring till dry.

7. Garnish with green chillies.

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Cooking with Seeds – Poppy: Event Round-Up

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Poppy is one of the oldest recorded spices in the world. It’s used in various culinary and medicinal purposes. It is obtained from the poppy opium (Papaver somniferum) plant. As mentioned in the wiki page of poppy seeds, the plant had been grown by the Sumerians. Poppy has also been mentioned in Egyptian papyrus scrolls as early as 1550 B.C.

Poppy was at first used as a sedative and then as a spice. But, this kidney shaped seed with its unmatched taste and aroma has stolen the hearts of thousands of foodies across the world. So, when I got to host the Cooking with Seeds event, the brain child of Priya of Priya’s Easy and Tasty Recipes, I chose poppy.

Poppy is extensively used in Bengali cuisine. Starting from stir fried poppy paste with a little garlic and salt to the famous alu-posto and dim posto sorse. Be it vegetarian or non-vegetarian dish poppy finds its place everywhere in Bengali preparation.

I have categorized the entries into four different classes depending on the type of the dish and without further ado here’s the list. Hope you enjoy it.


Vegetarian:

Nithu Bala of Nithu’s Kitchen
Beetroot Kurma

Priya of Priya’s Easy and Tasty Recipes
Sprouted Kala Channa Kurma,
Bittergourd Masala,
Broad Beans & Potato Stir fry,
Banana Blossom Dumplings Gravy

Roshan of Roshan’s Cucina
Green Pea Kurma

Pavanisrikanth  of FoodLovers
Aloo Kurma

Sangeetha of Sangi’s food world
Potato pakoda kuruma

Preethi Ram of Preethi’s Culinary
Navratna Kurma

Non – Vegetarian:

Roshan of Roshan’s Cucina
(Tomato Pilaf with) Mughlai Chicken

Nandini of Nandini’s Food Page
Fish Kurma
Egg Masala

Desserts:

Sangeetha of Sangi’s food world
Poppy seed Almond Basundi

Priya of Priya’s Easy and Tasty Recipes
Poppy Seeds Kheer

Jaya of Tamalapaku
Pala Poli

Nandini of Nandini’s Food Page
Bottlegourd and Moong Dal Payasam/Kheer

Miscellaneous:

Ayantika Ghosh of Eat Drink n Rock
Jam filled poppy seed cookies

Priya of Priya’s Easy and Tasty Recipes
Poppyseeds & Quinoa Spice Powder

Gayathri of Gayathri’s Cook Spot
Poppy Seeds Dinner Rolls

Tanvi of Sinfully Spicy
Bengali Beet Chops

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Mowa & Murki on Lakshmi Puja

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Sarat kal” – does that ring any bell? Of course it does. Other than the brilliant blue sky dotted with soft white clouds it’s that time of the year when you let go of all worries and enjoy the four days of Durga Puja. For our non-Bong friends, Sarat kal is the autumn season according to the Bengali calendar. Durga Puja, doesn’t only mean worshipping the goddess of feminine power, but a lot more – shopping before the puja, pandal hopping during the four days, and of course eating and eating and more eating.

I’m sure you all have left your health conscious souls at home and gorged on the wonderful street foods. I just can’t think about passing a puja without gulping on some phuchkas (fuchka) and biting on egg rolls. What’s your Puja special dish, do let us know?

Just after Durga Puja is Lakshmi puja. The goddess of wealth and well being is ushered to almost every Bengali household (though some people worship the goddess on Kali Puja day). This year Lakshmi Puja will be celebrated tomorrow.

After numerous calls, e-mails, wall posts and scraps from friends from all over the globe, I decided on posting something which is specially made for this occasion – murki and mowa (pronounced as moa).

Murki is made from a special variety of puffed rice called Khoi in Bengali and is mixed with molasses or gur. Mowa on the other hand can be prepared with Khoi, mudi or even chidde. Here’s how my mom prepares both these two sweet ambrosia. The basic method of preparation is the same.

Ingredients:

For murki:

½ kg of Puffed Rice (Khoi)

250gms of Molasses/ Jaggery (Gur)

Preparation:

  • Start stirring the jaggery over low heat.
  • As it turns sticky and sticks to the back of the ladle, take out of flame
  • Pour of the khoi and mix well
  • Keep aside in air tight container

For mowa:

  • Take about 350gms of jaggery
  • Mix the jaggery and khoi/muri/chidde together
  • With the help of your palm make big balls
  • Store in air tight containers

Mowa is still in the making, will put up the photo as soon as its done.

Don’t forget to have a copy of our Festive recipe e-book and the October calendar. And do send in your entries to the ongoing event Cooking with Seeds – Poppy, a brain child of Priya from Priya’s Easy and Tasty Recipes.

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Event Announcement: Cooking with Seeds – Poppy

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Poppy: The Gastronomic King

Poppy is one of the most widely used spices or rather seeds in any cuisine. The seeds though tiny have a huge influence in art of the gastronomy. As the wiki page on poppy rightly claims poppy had been essentially grown for medicinal purposes as a sedative, but more for its famous counterpart, the cuisine delights.

Poppy in Cuisine

Uses of poppy seeds find its preliminary element as a classic add-on to buttered egg noodles, fruit salad dressings and fragrant yeast breads. Poppy seeds lend a nutty flavor and texture to cookies, cakes, breads, strudels, pastry crusts and pancake, including even waffle batters. The seeds of the poppy plant are used extensively in and on umpteen food delights such as bagels, bialys, muffins or cakes and not to forget the famous alu posto (patato in poppy paste). The seeds can be crushed to manufacture poppy seed oil, which can vastly be employed in cooking. The primary flavor compound for poppy is 2-pentylfuran.

Poppy  – The healthy seed

Poppy seeds add a distinct flavor and taste to food. But that is not the only reason why they are consumed; poppy seeds provide quite a number of health benefits too. Poppy seeds are considered to be an excellent source of vital minerals like magnesium, zinc, calcium, etc. that are needed for the smooth functioning of all human organs. As they provide the body with a good source of carbohydrates, they add loads of energy in the body. The fatty acids aid in digestion as well as supplying other important acids required to break down food in the stomach. Poppy seeds contain linoleic acid and oleic acid. Linoleic acid protects the heart from many heart diseases and conditions, while oleic acid is known to help in prevention of breast cancer. Calories in poppy seeds is also comparatively less than other spices and herbs.

As it does not contain a lot of alkaloids, one of the poppy seeds nutrition facts is that it is used to treat all kinds of nervous disorders. It is given in minimum quantities to treat insomnia. It also helps to alleviate asthma and whooping cough symptoms. It is also used to treat diarrhea and other stomach related conditions. Its use in medicinal products and medicines is highly regulated though. Oil extracted from poppy seeds is also used to make drugs and medicines.

Poppy – The Event

With all these benefits in mind and also for its wonderful taste, when I thought of being a part of Priya’s Cooking with Seeds series, I instantly chose poppy to be the theme for this month. All through this month we’ll be hosting the Cooking with Seeds event, the brain child of Priyasuresh of Priya’s Easy and Tasty Recipes.

Send in your entries to bengalicuisine [at] gmail [dot] com with the following details and “Cooking with Seeds – Poppy” in the subject line:

  • Name:
  • Prepared dish:
  • URL of the recipe:
  • Name of website/blog:
  • URL of your site:
  • Image of the prepared recipe:

Entries will be accepted throughout this month till 31st October, 2010 12 midnight IST.

The entries can be recently posted during this month or can also be archived posts, but please update your posts with a link to Cook Like a Bong and Priya’s Easy and Tasty Recipes. We’ll love if you can add this logo to your posts.

Those of who don’t have a blog please send in your entries to the above email-id along with your details and the recipes. We’ll put up the recipe as a guest post in our site and include those on the round-up to be published in the first week of November.

We would love to know your suggestions and comments. Don’t forget to have a copy of our Festive recipe e-book and the October calendar.

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Monthly Mingle RoundUp Part #2

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Thank you all for your great response at the first part of Monthly Mingle RoundUp and as promised here comes the second part of roundup. Of the five different categories – soups, bakes, fruits, sides and others, I have posted the former two yesterday and here’s the last three. Which one did you like most?

Fruits

Oz of Kitchen Butterfly is crazy about poached pears, and so is her husband. So no points for guessing this one, she sent a wonderful Simply delicious pear recipes served with creamy rice pudding

When most of us are braving the winter chill (and some even hails), Quinn of Quinn’s Baking Diary is having a hard time in Australia coping with the mercury rising as high as 41̊C. That didn’t turn her down and here she is with a Roasted Corella Pears with Vanilla Bean & Lemon for the event.

Soma of e-Curry has brought the colors of her recent Disney world in her kitchen, if you don’t agree check out Moroccan Carrot & Orange Salad which says it all with those vibrant shades.

My Experiments & Food has a healthy Grape Raita to serve.

Sides

Spinach and Popeye are inseparable indeed. That’s what Shankari of Sacrameto Spice has to share with us – Sauteed Spinach with Raisins & Pine Nuts

Indrani of Appayan has a list of all the veggies that supply you with the nutrients just right for this dry and chilling winter. She puts in all to make this wholesome Bengali Winter Vegetable Medley

Another vegetable medley – Bandhakopi Palang Kablir ghonto from another Bong cook, Jayashree of Spice and Curry

Santhy Sankar of Appetite Treats enjoys the US winter with a Cauliflower Stir Fry

Coaxing her children to eat greens Deeba of Passionate About Baking has some colorful recipe to share with us, it’s a Chargrilled Broccoli with Chilli & Garlic

Herbs are an integral part of the winter market. Nandini of Usha Nandini’s Recipes had this spicy Masala Beans with Fenugreek leaves and Vegetables with Almonds to share

Shama of Easy to Cook Recipes had three recipes in mind – Green Pigeon Peas, Butter beans curry and Mochhai curry/ Field beans curry

Koki of Cooking With Koki has sent a lovely dish for the event – Pachai Mochai kootu as a part of her four day celebration of Pongal.

Kalva of Curry In Kadai started her new year with a lovely Moms Spicy Vegetable Kurma.

Enough of vegan. Lets take a short break and enjoy Chicken Saag, a chicken preparation with seasonal herbs, by Arundhuti of Gourmet Affair.

Others

Solange of Pebble soup had sent a lovely Risotto al Cavolfiori for the event.

Noodles can only mean Chinese. But ask Sudha of Malaysian Delicacies, she has something else in mind, a Noodles in Gravy (Mee Rebus Johor)

Well, you can’t talk about winter in North India without referring to Winter special-makke di roti and sarson da saag. Pari of Foodelicious has rightly contributed this all in one healthy delicacy.

Faiza of Faiza Ali’s Kitchen has prepared a Mexican dip, Guacamole for this occasion. Try it this winter along with chips or quesadillas.

Want to have a real treat? Try this Cauliflower Patties with Coriander from Graziana of Erbe in cucina (Cooking with herbs)

Well, enough heavy recipes here, lets have a cold drink. A Grape juice from the Kanchan of Kitchen Gossip

Which one did you like?

Here’s the photos of all the entries for this event:

Monthly Mingle – Winter Fruits and Vegetables

Ongoing Events

Don’t forget to take part in

Do send in your lovely entries for the events

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Monthly Mingle RoundUp Part #1

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A month earlier, I announced Monthly Mingle for Winter Fruits and Vegetables. I’m kicked with the response – 34 entries from 32 bloggers of 13 countries. Read on for a sumptuous winter treat.

A note of thanks

Since I started food blogging back in April 2008, Meeta had been an inspiration with her posts and photographs quality. So, when she agreed to let me to host her already famous monthly blog event – Monthly Mingle, I got excited. Meeta even designed the logo for the current event. Meeta, can’t thank you enough.

Event Theme

Choosing the event theme wasn’t easy. I being the 23rd blogger to host this event, you can pretty much assume that almost all types of food and accompaniments have been covered earlier. This being Winter, so thought of a very simple theme – Winter Fruits and Vegetables.

The Round up

I’ve tried to group the entries into 5 categories – Soups, Bakes, Fruits, Sides and Others. Due to post length, I’ve split the round up into two posts. Part 1 will talk about Soups and Bakes.

Which one did you like?

Soups

A potato and carrot soup from Divya of Dil Se, just perfect for the chilly winter evenings.

Tigerfish of Teczape- An Escape of Food had something else in mind. She thought of a good heart-healthy seasonal soup for winter. Best way to use the seasonal produces in her Kale Winter Vegetable Soup with Salmon and Tofu.

Aoife of The Daily Spud found a little hope to cope with the ice cold winters of Ireland with this wonderful Ukranian soup called Borscht, which she learned from a cookery lesson in Moscow school cafeteria.

PJ of Ginger & Garlic has a thick and spicy soup to share with us, the name Parsnip soup with kale and roasted garlic says it all.

Sarah of Maison Cupcake, UK has a healthy and ‘immediate’ soup to cater in this winter, the Immediate Butternut Squash and Chestnut Soup is good deal to pamper your taste buds.

Though that’s not what we mean when we say ‘soup’, but the Mango Cauliflower Rasam from Ruchika of Ruchika Cooks is a must have for all of us who would like to drink healthy this winter.

Bakes

With winter, comes Christmas bells and with comes the delicious Christmas cakes. Happy Cook of My Kitchen Treasure has something special to share, it’s a Cranberry upside down cake.

Joanne of Eats Well With Others took a new year resolution of not bringing back breads to home, the only breads allowed inside her kitchen are the ones prepared solely by her. Here’s her first step. She sends an amazing Fried Eggs on Toast with Cheddar and Avocado.

This French lady, Gaelle of WhatAreYouFeedingYourKidsTheseDays is happy to serve her family with a simple yet delicious dish, the Gratin of Baked Winter Vegetables. It’s an adapted version of a very traditional French dish that was perfect for the freezing temperatures of Philadelphia: a Gratin Dauphinois (baked potatoes).

Meeta of What’s For Lunch, Honey? sent a lovely looking Kohlrabi Turnip Gratin, never thought turnip would look so tempting.

Saveur from The Taste Space has a wholesome dessert to serve – Apple Cranberry Oat Crumble.

Nandini of Usha Nandini’s Recipes dared to add some oranges to her biscuits, and look what she has got – flower shaped Orange Biscuits (note the beautiful orange tinge).

Further Reading: Think Spice -Think Turmeric, Eggs, Festival of Rice Part 1, Part 2, Sweet Tooth, Non Veggie

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