Sunday Mutton Curry

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The grandfather clock on the old living room wall just stopped striking 11. Its a lazy Sunday morning and you’ve just finished your Sunday breakfast with luchi, cholar dal and sandesh. Already the dining room is filled with the smell of kasha mangsho from the kitchen. Now, this feels like a dream. The special meals of Sunday will always be missed, now that I’m thousands of miles away from home.

Pathar mangsho (goat meat) can easily be classified as a comfort food as well as an exotic Bengali dish. Some would say, why such a rich and spicy food be called comfort food. The answer is in the meal, garam garam bhaat (warm white rice) with pathar mangsho (mutton curry) and a slice of gandoraj lebu (lime)– do you want anything else from this world?

Goat Curry

Kolkata is always related to the wonderful rasogolla and sandesh it has produced for more than a century now. But, Kolkata is also famous for its goat meat curry. The mutton curry from Shyambazar’s Golbari is one of the best, or probably the best mutton preparation you can ever have. The rich and spicy dark mutton curry can easily be the highlight of your week.

Previously I had quite a disappointing result prearing mutton. Either it turned out chewy, and the second time I was engrossed in my TV series, and the mutton got burnt to the point where I had to use a knife to scrap out the pieces from the vessel. So, this time anxious and determined I set to prepare mutton. I marinated the mutton overnight and slow cooked it for almost a couple of hours. The results was just awesome!

Sunday Mutton Curry

Indian, Side, Comfort food, Bengali recipe, Authentic bengali recipe, Bengali cuisine, Mutton curry, Goat meat, Bengali mutton curry, Sunday mutton curry, Bangla recipe
Cooks in    Serves 4
Ingredients
  • 2 lb goat meat
  • For the marinade -
  • ¼ cup sour yogurt
  • 1 medium size onion, made to paste
  • 1 teaspoon cumin powder
  • 1 teaspoon chili powder
  • 1 teaspoon turmeric powder
  • 1 teaspoon dhaniya powder
  • 1 tablespoon ginger paste
  • 1 tablespoon garlic paste
  • 2 tablespoon mustard oil
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • For the gravy -
  • ½ cup grated raw papaya
  • ½ medium size onion, slivered lengthwise
  • 1 big size potato cut to quarters
  • 1 teaspoon cumin powder
  • 1 teaspoon chili powder
  • 1 teaspoon turmeric powder
  • 1 teaspoon dhaniya powder
  • 1 tablespoon ginger paste
  • 1 tablespoon garlic paste
  • ½ teaspoon granulated sugar
  • 3 tablespoon mustard oil
  • Salt to taste
  • Warm water
Directions
  • Mix all the ingredients except the turmeric, oil and salt of the marinade in a large glass bowl. Add the washed mutton pieces, and using your hand, coat the marinade evenly over the mutton. Add the turmeric and salt and give it another round of mixing. Pour the oil. Cover the bowl with a kiln film and marinate for at least 4 hours or you can also keep it overnight. Place it in the lower rack of your refrigerator
  • Take out the mutton about an hour before yous start cooking, and bring it to normal temperature.
  • Heat oil in a large wok. Coat the potatoes with a pinch of turmeric and salt and fry in that oil till the potatoes start to brown in places. Take the potatoes out and reserve for later.
  • Put in the slivered onions in the same oil and saute till they start wilting. Add the sugar and fry till the onions are caramelized. Now, add the marinated mutton and stir to coat with the oil and onions. Add all the spices and grated papaya and give it a good stir.
  • Increase the flame to high, and start reducing the marinade, stirring frequently. Make sure that the marinade doesn\'t stick to the bottom of the wok. The marinade will start to change color to a darker shade and so will the mutton.
  • Once the marinade is almost dry and dark, pour in 2 cups of warm water and cover the wok with a lid. At this point, you can also transfer the mutton in a pressure cooker, and cook in it.
  • If you are not using a pressure cooker, lower the flame to low and slow cook for almost 1 to 11/2 hour. Check in between.
  • Depending upon the mutton, the cooking time varies. Pour warm water as and when required. Once, the mutton is half cooked, add the potatoes and cook till the potatoes are done.
  • Serve hot with warm white rice or luchi.

Golbarir Mangsho

Hot Tips – Mixing turmeric and salt together with the other spices in the marinade makes the mutton harder and it becomes a chewy when cooked. Papain, the enzyme release from raw papaya help to cook the mutton and make it softer. Also, the grated papaya gives an extra thickness to the gravy. The trick to cook mutton is to cook it over low flame.

Other LinksMutton Curry from eCurry, Railway mutton curry from BongMom

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Bhendi Diye Chingri

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Now, this is a tricky question. Do you think Bengalis are all about fish? Whenever I meet someone who is not a Bong, he/she always ask me this question – do you eat vegetables or is it just fish? Growing up in a family with my widowed grand mom, I have seen lots of vegetables being made at home, vegetables curries without even the hint of onion or garlic – and believe it or not those tasted heavenly.

Its probably because Bengal being such a fertile land and with loads of rivers the balance between vegetables and fish is always there. Whereas in the Western parts of India though the majority of population is vegetarian they mostly stick to different types of lentils for their daily home made recipes.What is your opinion of this?

Chingri Bhendir Tarkari

Coming to vegetables in Bengal, especially in summer, its like a fair. The different types of veggies that you get in the market is beyond imagination, and of these patol or pointed gourd and bhendi or okra are two of my favorites.

My grandmother had her way into the kitchen. Her way of balancing whole spices and ground ones had its own unique style. She used to make this dry curry with okra, pumpkin and potatoes with just a little nigella – and it was tasted out of the world. I made this the same way with just a little twist – I added a few shrimps to it.

Chingri Diye Bhendi

Indian, Side, Prawns, Bengali shrimp recipe, Bangla ranna, Bengali cuisine, Bengali vegetables
Cooks in    Serves 4
Ingredients
  • 1 cup okra, split lenthwise
  • 1 cup cued pumpkin
  • 1 cup cubed potatoes
  • 8-10 medium size shrimps
  • 1 teaspoon nigella
  • 1 teaspoon turmeric powder
  • ½ teaspoon chili powder
  • Salt to taste
  • 3 tablespoon mustard oil
Directions
  • Heat a tablespoon of oil in a skillet and lightly fry the shrimps tll they turn pinkish in color and starts to curl, take out and place them in a kitchen towel to drain out the excess oil
  • Heat the rest of the oil in a wok, mix a pinch of salt and turmeric to the split okra and lightly fry them. Take out and keep aside
  • In the same oil add the nigella, and saute till they start sputtering. Add the pumpkin and potatoes and fry for 2-3 minutes.
  • Pour about 3 tablespoons of water in a small bowl and mix the turmeric powder, chili powder and salt – mix to make a runny paste. Pour the paste to the wok and mix to coat the vegetables
  • Stir till the spices start to dry, make sure it doesn\'t stick to the bottom of the wok. Pour in about 1 ½ cup of water and cook covered till the vegetables are almost cooked
  • Add the okra and shrimps, cook for 2-3 minutes more. Serve hot with warm white rice or roti.

Chingri Bhendi

Hot Tips – Okra being a very slimy vegetables, its always better to wash and then cut the okra. If you do it the other way, the okra will be slimier making the gravy very gooey. Also, that’s the reason I fry the okra first and then put it in the curry.

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Food Review – Korean Stir fry Ready to Cook

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When it comes to Southeast Asian cuisine, other than the Thai curries, I always opt for the stir fries. So when Saffron Road Foods sent their newly launched simmer sauces for a review I was overjoyed to find the Korean Stir fry ready to cook product in the package. I instantly thought of cooking and reviewing this simmer sauce in my blog.

Preparing the simmer sauce took me less than 15 minutes from chopping vegetables to serving it to the dinner table. The result was an awesome combination of healthy homemade food with loads of vegetables and the taste of restaurant style meal. The ease of cooking it also made this simmer sauce a perfect for a date night or just when you are too lazy to go through through spice cupboard to prepare something for dinner.

Saffron Road Food Korean Stir Fry Pouch

I prepared it with some South Asian choice vegetables – baby corn, bok choy, carrots, mushroom with an Bengali addition of some cubed onions to it. The packet for Korean Stir fry had the option of beef strips for meat, I opted for chicken and it turned out perfect. You can also use other meat like lamb, or for the vegetarian option try it with tofu.

Most of the Saffron Road Foods simmer sauces have almost the same directions to prepare the food. Heat oil in a skillet, add the meat and vegetable, saute them. Add the simmer sauce and stir. Cook till the sauce starts to bubble. I feel, as these simmer sauces are used even by the novice cooks, a mention of which vegetables to use for which simmer sauce would do good. The last time I prepared Rogan Josh simmer sauce, I don’t think mushroom or baby corn would go with that.

The Saffron Road Food products are all non-GMO verified products and so a re very safe. They have some of the simmer sauces available in their online store, and you can also get all their products in almost all of the large retailers throughout US. Check their store locator to choose the store nearest to you.

As with the other simmer sauces from Safrron Road Food, I truly enjoyed making and eating the Korean Stir fry. I served it with some jasmine rice and vinegar dipped cucumber, and it felt like a to-go order from our favorite South Asian restaurant. Here’s how I made it.

Korean Stir Fry With Chicken

Side, Korean, Korean stir fry, Simmer sauce, Product review, Korean cuisine, Stir fry recipe
Cooks in    Serves 4
Ingredients
  • 1 lb chicken, cut into thin strips
  • 2 carrots, cut into inch size strips
  • 1 baby bok choy, chopped coarsely
  • 1/2 can baby corn, halved lengthwise
  • 1/2 cup chopped mushroom
  • 1/2 onion, chopped into cubes
  • 1 packet Saffron Road Food Korean Stir Fry simmer sauce
  • 2 tablespoon canola oil
Directions
  • Wash the vegetables, and drain out the excess water
  • Heat oil in a skillet and add the vegetables except the bok choy. Saute till the vegetables are half cooked
  • Now add the chicken strips and bok choy and cook till the chicken strips are well done
  • Pour in the contents of the pouch, mix well with the meat and vegetables and cook covered for 2-3 minutes or till the sauce starts bubbling.
  • If you want to keep the gravy serve instantly with jasmine rice, else cook till the gravy is dried.

Korean Stir Fry

Disclaimer – I am not paid by Saffron Road Foods to write product reviews in Cook Like a Bong.

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