Dhaka Style Doi Bhaat/ Curd Rice

Follow me on Twitter. Fan us on Facebook . Visit my Flickr photostream.
You can also Subscribe to BengaliCuisine by Email

My grandparents hail from Chittagong (my paternal granddad) and Barishal (my maternal granddad). They both have shifted to Kolkata during partition. But, both the families could never give off the style of cooking, that’s the Bangal style of cooking food. My mom, who learnt how to cook from her mom, has passed on her culinary skills (at least a portion) to me. So, whenever I cook, whatever I cook – the influence of Bangladesh is always there – be it the Chittagong special begun marichut or the lau khosha chhechki from Barishal or even the Mexican style fried rice, which I couldn’t keep out without the Bengali twist.

Even though Bangladesh seems to be very small country in the world map, the cuisine is diverse. Every state you visit in Bangladesh has a different style of cooking. A simple potato curry will taste different when you travel from Dhaka to Kumilla.

So, when Chandrima Guha posted a photo of Dhaka style doi bhaat, I just couldn’t help myself but request her to have it as a guest post in Cook Like a Bong. Dhaka cuisine is special for the non-vegetarian dishes from chicken to fish and from beef to lamb – cooked in rich spicy gravy. Chandrima says, she has learnt cooking from her mom, grand mom, mom-in-law & aunt-in-law. Of the many hundreds of popular non-vegetarian dishes so popular, this not so popular yet century old simple vegetarian dish from Dhaka is sure to steal the show. The Dhaka style Doi Bhaat, Chandrima learnt from her granny. This no spicy pulao is much different from the South Indian curd rice. This vegan rice is cooked with kalonji (nigella/ kalo jeera) with the flavoring agent as gondhoraj lebu.

Though the smell of gondhoraj can’t be replaced, as Anjan Chatterjee, author of Mainland China Cook Book and the owner of Specialty Group of restaurants mentions in “Scent of Lime’, searching for the root of gondhoraj, but for those of you who have days to go before you reach the shores of Bengal, you can use Khafir lime or Thai lime in place of gondhoraj lebu.

Ingredients:

  • 500 gram Gobindobhog atop chaal
  • 3 big Gondhoraj lebu,
  • 10 Gondhoraj lebu leaves(optional)
  • 4 green chilies
  • 2 teaspoon sugar (optional)
  • 2 tablespoon yoghurt
  • 2 tablespoon refined oil or ghee
  • Finely chopped coriander leaves
  • ½  teaspoon nigella
  • Salt to taste

Preparation:

  • Cook rice, spread on a flat utensil & cool it.
  • Mix yoghurt, sugar, salt, 2 chilies, Gondhoraj lebu juice, Gondhoraj lebu pieces (squeezed pieces) and gondhoraj lebu leaves (if available) with rice.
  • Keep aside for at least an hour.
  • Take out gondhoraj lebu pieces & leaves from rice just before cooking.
  • Heat oil or ghee in a wok or non-stick pan.
  • Add nigella & 2 green chilies.
  • Mix the rice & fry for 10 minutes on medium flame.
  • Sprinkle 1 teaspoon ghee(if cooked in oil) & coriander leaves.
  • Take out from flame & serve hot.

Hot Tips – Both lime and yogurt is very good for keeping yourself cool during the summer heat.

Don’t forget to participate in the Father’s Day event happening at Cook Like a Bong. The last date of submission of all your entries is 15th June, 2011. You can send as many entries as you want . Send in your dad’s favorite recipes, your stories about your father, and any gift ideas for the day, or just send a photo of yours with your father – we’ll publish here on Father’s Day.

And, for the Father’s loving child there will be a surprise gift announced for the best entry. So, send your entries quickly and enroll yourself to get a great gift from Cook Like a Bong.

 

If you like this post, please consider linking to it or sharing it with others. I’ll love to hear your comments too.You can also Subscribe to BengaliCuisine by Email, or Subscribe in a reader

Share

Mexican Brown Rice with a Bengali Twist

Follow me on Twitter. Fan us on Facebook . Visit my Flickr photostream.
You can also Subscribe to BengaliCuisine by Email

A weekday generally starts as early as 7 in the morning, preparing breakfast and lunch, taking a shower, having your food and reaching office by 9 am. After an entire day of work, coming back home and then again thinking what to prepare for dinner is like a capital punishment.

The pain of thinking what-to-cook for dinner tonight kills my little energy for cooking, so I always plan ahead. Weeknight dinners are never that pompous, the best way to make your tongue and tummy both happy is to have a casserole preparation- doesn’t take much time, and tastes great. With the constant pestering from friends and family, I finally started reducing my carbohydrate content (but, that doesn’t mean I left having rasogollas :)), anyways a bowl of brown rice couple of times a week is fine with me. But, still shifting from the fine white rice to the sticky brown rice is a little jump on my side. So, the other night I thought of preparing my brown rice a little differently. Searching for brown rice recipes, I came across one which had Mexican style brown rice preparation. The preparation was with boneless chicken, but as I am on a strict vegetarian diet at present, I thought of replacing the chicken pieces with soya bean chunks and making it a little spicier to suite the Bengali tongue of mine.

I prepared it on gas oven, but if you are too lazy even to click on the burner, you can try this recipe in a microwave. Just follow the instructions mentioned in the microwave fried rice recipe. Put in the soya bean chunks along with the vegetables.

Ingredients:

1 cup brown rice
2 large sized onions, finely chopped
6-8 cloves garlic
1 bell pepper (any color), finely chopped
1 cup soya bean chunks, steamed
½ teaspoon turmeric powder
1 teaspoon chili powder
2 tablespoons sunflower oil
Salt to taste

Preparation:

  • Heat oil in a medium nonstick saucepan over medium heat and saute the onions and garlic untill the onions turn golden brown
  • Add in the bell pepper.
  • Stir and add the brown rice,
  • Pour in 3 cups of water or broth (optional) , add in the spices
  • Bring mixture to a boil, then reduce heat to low.
  • Simmer, covered, for 20 to 25 minutes or until the broth is absorbed.
  • Season and serve hot

Hot Tip – You can add vegetables of your choice, and have it with spicy chicken curry.

Food Contest

Don’t forget to participate in the Father’s Day event happening at Cook Like a Bong. The last date of submission of all your entries is 15th June, 2011. You can send as many entries as you want . Send in your dad’s favorite recipes, your stories about your father, and any gift ideas for the day, or just send a photo of yours with your father – we’ll publish here on Father’s Day.

And, for the Father’s loving child there will be a surprise gift announced for the best entry. So, send your entries quickly and enroll yourself to get a great gift from Cook Like a Bong.

 

If you like this post, please consider linking to it or sharing it with others. I’ll love to hear your comments too.You can also Subscribe to BengaliCuisine by Email, or Subscribe in a reader

Share

Inviting recipes for Father’s Day – Contest

Follow me on Twitter. Fan us on Facebook . Visit my Flickr photostream.
You can alsoSubscribe to BengaliCuisine by Email

The urban dictionary defines the word “Father” as the guy who criticizes you for everything you do, and never admits that he is wrong. But whether you admit it or not, fathers’ are the best support. He was there during your first knee bruise, your first breakup and even to celebrate your graduation.  And, of course fathers are the ATMs (read, all-time money). It’s just a month left to celebrate a day for this awesome man. Father’s day is generally celebrated on the third Sunday of June in some countries and in other dates in the different parts of the world.

It would be interesting to know how Father’s Day came into practice and celebrated worldwide with an equal sincerity and respect as any other significant holidays. Here’s a short history on the holiday, and meaning of the different colors of roses to be worn that Day. You may even refer the page to others to share the information by clicking on the link given below.

About 4,000 years ago a young boy named Elmusu wished his Babylonian father good health and a long life by carving a Father’s Day message on a card made out of clay. No one knows what happened to Elmesu or his father, but the tradition of having a special day honoring fathers has continued through the years in countries across the world.

The Countries, where the Catholic Church were of significant influence on the culture of the society, Father’s Day is celebrated on St. Joseph’s Day (March 19). However, a more secular celebration which is not associated with any religion is followed in recent times to highlight the increased diversity among people from all over the globe coexisting together in one place.

Father’s Day is celebrated popularly on 3rd Sunday in June in many parts of the world. The idea for creating a day for children to honor their fathers began in Spokane, Washington. A woman by the name of Sonora Smart Dodd thought of the idea for Father’s Day while listening to a Mother’s Day sermon in 1909. Having been raised by her father, Henry Jackson Smart, after her mother died, Sonora wanted her father to know how special he was to her. It was her father that made all the parental sacrifices and was, in the eyes of his daughter, a courageous, selfless, and loving man. Sonora’s father was born in June, so she chose to hold the first Father’s Day celebration in Spokane, Washington on the 19th of June, 1910.

In 1924 President Calvin Coolidge proclaimed the third Sunday in June as Father’s Day. President Nixon, in 1972, established a permanent national observance of Father’s Day to be held on the third Sunday of June. So Father’s Day was born as a token of love and gratitude that a daughter cherishes for her beloved father. Roses are the Father’s Day flowers: red to be worn for a living father and white if the father has died.

Just a month to go for Father’s Day and we at Cook Like a Bong are here to celebrate with you all. Send in your dad’s favorite recipes, your stories about your father, and any gift ideas for the day, or just send a photo of yours with your father – we’ll publish here on Father’s Day (19th June, 2011).

Blogger friends can write about it in your blog adding a link to this post, and we’ll be happy if you use this logo in your posts. Non-bloggers can send in your entries directly to us as a .doc file. The image size must be less than 80Kb.

Send in your entries to bengalicuisine[at]gmail[dot]com with the subject line  “Father’s Day entry”. The last date for sending your entries is midnight 15th June PST. The best entry will win a surprise gift from Cook Like a Bong.

Mention your

  • Name:
  • Blog Name:
  • Type of entry: Recipe/Stories/Gift Ideas/Photos
  • Blog URL:
  • Post URL:
  • Attach the photo along with the mail.
If you like this post, please consider linking to it or sharing it with others. I’ll love to hear your comments too.You can also Subscribe to BengaliCuisine by Email, or Subscribe in a reader
Share

Tutti Frutti Cake for Tagore’s Birthday

Bengal is celebrating the 150th birth anniversary of the great Indian poet, Rabindranath Tagore. He was the first non-European to receive the Nobel Prize, and also the author of 28 voluminous books, more than 2500 songs (that are recited by fishermen and intellectuals alike), a polymath, and he also penned National Anthem of 2 countries, India and Bangladesh. Rabindranath lives in the heart of every Bengali. Celebrations in Bengal have started from the weekend to commemorate this great man on his birthday, 25th Baisakh (25th day of the first month of the Bengali calendar). Jorasako Thakur bari, the birth place of Gurudev is decked up with flowers and there are programs organized throughout the day. Have a glimse of it in the video below.

Celebrating tagore 150th Birth Anniversary

We are also here to celebrate another joy; Cook Like a Bong Facebook Page has just crossed 4000 likes making it one of the largest Bengali community in Facebook. Thanks to all our readers for making our effort such a huge success. We would love to hear more feedbacks and comments from you.


Here’s to our celebration, a simple tea time cake.

Ingredients:

·         2 ½ cups of self raising flour

·         2 cup castor sugar

·         3 eggs

·         2 teaspoon baking powder

·         ½ cup clarified butter/ vegetable oil

·         1 cup tutti fruitti, raisins

·         2 teaspoon vanilla essence

Preparation:

·         Preheat the oven to 200°C (390°F or gas mark 4).

·         Sift the self raising flour and the baking powder together

·         Break the eggs in a large bowl and beat with an electric beater, at medium speed at first and then at high speed for 3-4mins

·         Pour in the clarified butter and sugar together in a bowl and beat with an electric beater till it becomes light and fluffy

·         Mix the eggs and sugar mixture together and beat again for a couple of minutes

·         Add the flour gradually to the beaten mixture, and fold in

·         Sprinkle about two teaspoon of flour in the tutti frutti and coat them. Add these to the cake batter, keep aside about ¼ cup of tutti frutti

·         Grease a rectangular oven safe pan with butter or oil and pour in the cake mixture

·         Put in the left tutti frutti over the cake batter

·         Bake in the preheated oven for 30-45 mins or till a knife inserted in the cake comes out clean

·         Keep aside for 30mins to cool on a wire rack

·         Serve with tea or coffee


Hot Tips – If you are using maida instead of self raising flour, then beat the cake batter just before putting in the tutti frutti at least for 4-5mins, else the cake will not become spongy

Blog Widget by LinkWithin
Share