How do people find this blog: 5 keyword goof ups

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How do people come to your blog?

Has it ever happened to you that visitors come to your blog via completely unrelated keywords. Say you run a travel site but visitors come via “tamil woman saree bathing“? Well, we at Cook Like a Bong  regularly get such search engine traffic hilarious moments. This post is about how google messes up while directing visitors to bengalicuisine.net.

One of the tasks of a webmaster is to understand what are people looking for when search engines send them your way. For instance, this being a site on Bengali cuisine, I would expect visitors to come here while searching for Bengali food, Bengali recipes, Bengali rasgulla, Chanchra, bangali ranna etc .

However, sometimes the keywords that send traffic range from uncommon, to weird, to outright irrelevant. Here’s 5 such keyword strings:

Google

Mishti doi food poisoning

I’ve heard of food poisoning being caused from meat, raw foods, and unwashed vegetables. But never from consuming Mishti Dahi. Medicine sites say that the symptoms of food poisoning are vomiting and abdominal cramping.

The natural question, then, is: why was someone looking for how to prepare Mishti Doi that causes vomiting? OMG. Did we inadvertently participate in some ‘killer intent’? Or, ‘how to fake pregnancy to your husband’? Just when I was about to get excited about all this, google search spilled the beans.

The first result on Google for Mishti Doi food poisoning is Sudeshna’s post on Bhapa Chingri (Steamed Shrimp). Phew! Figure out why.

How to color diyas crafts

I was surprised at first. After all, why would someone looking for craft activities like how to color diyas would come to a Bengali cooking site. But then it dawned. One year after writing a post on Diwali Diya Daler Bada, Google suddenly started sending loads of visitors to this post. Evidently, one of them turned unlucky. Check out the post for some colorful diwali diyas.

Advisable to eat rohu in monsoon?

Well, Sudeshna has talked about rohu fish (or rui maach) in 3 posts – Macher Dimer Vada (Roe fritter), Macher Jhol (Fish Curry) and Doi Rui (Rohu Yogurt gravy) and about monsoon in 5 posts. But never, I repeat never, has she advised on whether to eat rohu in monsoon.

Being a Bengali almost always automatically meant that you ‘have to’ love fish (in addition to several other bong connection myths). And now do search engines also expect a Bengali cook to even advice on seasonal variation in safety factors of eating any variety of fish. Duh!

Morola.com

A quick google search will return results that start with Motorola.com And why not? Commonsense dictates the odds of someone looking for Motorola.com is higher than ABengaliWordforaFish.com.  More than Google’s misplaced results, what surprised me more was who on earth wants to search for a website like NameofTheFish.com?

Pepped up, I searched for several such sites and here’re the results…

rui.com will redirect you to a golf and tennis website

ilish.com and katla.com seem cybersquatters

pabda.com or chingri.com don’t even exist and

tangra.com is  a web solutions provider. Indeed, curiosity killed the cat. 😛

I'm starting to crack

I'm starting to crack

Which Beatles record started as egg and bacon?

Yes, Beatles composed a song ‘Yesterday’, whose lyrics had words like eggs, omlette, ham, cheese and bacon.  In fact, this is one of the few songs that talk of egg delicacies. Sample this:

Scrambled eggs,
Good for breakfast, dinner time or brunch,
Don’t buy six or twelve, buy a bunch,
And we’ll have a lunch on scrambled eggs.

But would Paul McCartney have thought in his lifetime that someone looking for his famous song would come across a how to cook Scrambled Eggs post at a Bengali food website? Hell no.

Well, I guess you have traffic coming from such funny keywords too. Please share a few here.

Images Courtesy: Danny Sullivan and 1HappySnapper

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Bengali Food Bloggers Interview Part #1

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Bengali Food Bloggers Interview

Almost 6 months back, we (Sudeshna and Kalyan) came up with a list of Top 7 Bengali Food Blogs. Of course, the list was with our personal experience and didn’t follow any standard procedure for ratings. Soon afterwards, we planned to interview each blogger in an attempt to bring their ‘other side’ to you.

6 of the Top 7 bloggers agreed to an interview and we emailed the same questionnaire to each. Now that we’ve received responses from all six, we’re starting Bengali Food Bloggers Interview series. You’ve known their recipes. Now you can know their personal side too.

The original answers have been tweaked a little to remove the typos etc, keeping the answers identical in spirit. The text is Italics is our own commentary. In Part 1, we’ll feature Jayashree Mandal of Spice and Curry.

About Jayashree Mandal

Jayashree Mandal started the blog in Oct 2006 with the first post on Alu Posto ar Amer Ambal. However, the posts became frequent and regular only from Nov 2007. With a pagerank of 4, the blog is fairly popular. Samples – Mochar Ghonto, Pomphreter Kalia, Pui Shager Cohorchori. The blog has a good blogroll list too. Also, most of the recent images have copyright notice. Good move to thwart rampant plagiarism on the web. Located in Kolkata, Jayashree also has a personal blog.

What inspires you to write a food blog?

I started my blog on a personal note to keep track of the recipes that I was trying out and making while staying far away from home. This was also a useful engagement for me as I am a stay-at-home mom.

Then of course there were few blogs like Cream Puffs in Venice and Tigers and Strawberries and our very own Mahanandi and Sailu’s Kitchen which are like true leaders to me who has also contributed to the fact of starting this blog.

Who had been your inspiration for cooking?

I do think it is my ma and ma-in-law who has greatly influenced me or rather inspired me to cook. [Well, a positive Saas Bahu chemistryJ]

Who was and is your greatest support(s) for this blog?

Support I do think is my ma-in-law as she has always helped me coming up with new recipes as I do think a food blog is all about good ,authentic recipes and food.

My hubby who is always there to taste a dish and give honest opinion about it, before I go ahead and publish it.

What was the first dish that you prepared and when?

If I can recall perfectly, my ma was quite ill for sometime. So the cooking has to be done by me . Hmm… May be when I was in 11th standard and I prepared simple Khichuri and dim bhaja (omellete)

What are the 3 food blogs that you would recommend our readers to read?

I do think this is very difficult, as there are many good food blogs, I would certainly emphasize to the food and clarity of recipe part, so my list will include:

How many cook books do you have?

I generally don’t try to cook from cookbooks unless I am in a mood to try out something new. I have Veg Khana by Neeta Mehta, Non-Veg starters By Sanjeev Kapoor and last an old Bengali cookbook “Ranna Samagro” by Vincent Gomez and Bela Dey

What’s your favorite cookbook?

Nothing in particular.

Tell us something about food from your part of the world?

I have spent my childhood days in UP and then again I am a Bengali, so I have imbibed everything from both the parts, I like eating as much a Nimona with rice as much ilish macher Bhapa with garam bhaat. [Great variation, lady.]

What would you eat for your last supper?

This is definitely a light dessert like a flavoured yogurt or payesh or a slice of cake with a scoop of ice-cream on top

Which other food blogs do you read regularly?

I like to read

And some International Food Blogs like

Your fondest food memory?

There are many interesting food memories, but then the hustle-bustle during Durga Puja and the entire way of spending the time with cooking, eating good food and enjoying with family is perhaps my fondest memory revolving around food and cooking.

Your most trusty kitchen companion?

This I am leaving it, as all are my companions.

What made you to call your blog “Spice and Curry”?

Don’t know, I was just looking to register at blogger and in a jiffy, it splashed and there I was working for my blog.

Name three dishes (along with their links) from your blog that you like preparing often

Think it will be Chingir Macher jhal, Kosha Mangsho and Apple cinnamon Cake

Which cookbook can you not do without and which chef is your hero/heroine?

Nothing in particular.

Anything you want to add which I missed out.

Just wanted to say, that one should enjoy cooking and serving the people who matter to us the most, instead of cooking things just for the sake of blogging. We are here, food blogging because our family has been cooperative and supportive of whatever we are doing.

I just wish we should not take things for granted. Blogging should be enjoyed and it is a sure way of de-stressing unless we cross the limit and it starts to give stress. Avoiding unnecessary competition and living in harmony is always a way better thing to do.

And last but not the least, it was a pleasure giving this interview. All the Best.

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Monthly Mingle RoundUp Part #2

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Thank you all for your great response at the first part of Monthly Mingle RoundUp and as promised here comes the second part of roundup. Of the five different categories – soups, bakes, fruits, sides and others, I have posted the former two yesterday and here’s the last three. Which one did you like most?

Fruits

Oz of Kitchen Butterfly is crazy about poached pears, and so is her husband. So no points for guessing this one, she sent a wonderful Simply delicious pear recipes served with creamy rice pudding

When most of us are braving the winter chill (and some even hails), Quinn of Quinn’s Baking Diary is having a hard time in Australia coping with the mercury rising as high as 41̊C. That didn’t turn her down and here she is with a Roasted Corella Pears with Vanilla Bean & Lemon for the event.

Soma of e-Curry has brought the colors of her recent Disney world in her kitchen, if you don’t agree check out Moroccan Carrot & Orange Salad which says it all with those vibrant shades.

My Experiments & Food has a healthy Grape Raita to serve.

Sides

Spinach and Popeye are inseparable indeed. That’s what Shankari of Sacrameto Spice has to share with us – Sauteed Spinach with Raisins & Pine Nuts

Indrani of Appayan has a list of all the veggies that supply you with the nutrients just right for this dry and chilling winter. She puts in all to make this wholesome Bengali Winter Vegetable Medley

Another vegetable medley – Bandhakopi Palang Kablir ghonto from another Bong cook, Jayashree of Spice and Curry

Santhy Sankar of Appetite Treats enjoys the US winter with a Cauliflower Stir Fry

Coaxing her children to eat greens Deeba of Passionate About Baking has some colorful recipe to share with us, it’s a Chargrilled Broccoli with Chilli & Garlic

Herbs are an integral part of the winter market. Nandini of Usha Nandini’s Recipes had this spicy Masala Beans with Fenugreek leaves and Vegetables with Almonds to share

Shama of Easy to Cook Recipes had three recipes in mind – Green Pigeon Peas, Butter beans curry and Mochhai curry/ Field beans curry

Koki of Cooking With Koki has sent a lovely dish for the event – Pachai Mochai kootu as a part of her four day celebration of Pongal.

Kalva of Curry In Kadai started her new year with a lovely Moms Spicy Vegetable Kurma.

Enough of vegan. Lets take a short break and enjoy Chicken Saag, a chicken preparation with seasonal herbs, by Arundhuti of Gourmet Affair.

Others

Solange of Pebble soup had sent a lovely Risotto al Cavolfiori for the event.

Noodles can only mean Chinese. But ask Sudha of Malaysian Delicacies, she has something else in mind, a Noodles in Gravy (Mee Rebus Johor)

Well, you can’t talk about winter in North India without referring to Winter special-makke di roti and sarson da saag. Pari of Foodelicious has rightly contributed this all in one healthy delicacy.

Faiza of Faiza Ali’s Kitchen has prepared a Mexican dip, Guacamole for this occasion. Try it this winter along with chips or quesadillas.

Want to have a real treat? Try this Cauliflower Patties with Coriander from Graziana of Erbe in cucina (Cooking with herbs)

Well, enough heavy recipes here, lets have a cold drink. A Grape juice from the Kanchan of Kitchen Gossip

Which one did you like?

Here’s the photos of all the entries for this event:

Monthly Mingle – Winter Fruits and Vegetables

Ongoing Events

Don’t forget to take part in

Do send in your lovely entries for the events

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Monthly Mingle RoundUp Part #1

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A month earlier, I announced Monthly Mingle for Winter Fruits and Vegetables. I’m kicked with the response – 34 entries from 32 bloggers of 13 countries. Read on for a sumptuous winter treat.

A note of thanks

Since I started food blogging back in April 2008, Meeta had been an inspiration with her posts and photographs quality. So, when she agreed to let me to host her already famous monthly blog event – Monthly Mingle, I got excited. Meeta even designed the logo for the current event. Meeta, can’t thank you enough.

Event Theme

Choosing the event theme wasn’t easy. I being the 23rd blogger to host this event, you can pretty much assume that almost all types of food and accompaniments have been covered earlier. This being Winter, so thought of a very simple theme – Winter Fruits and Vegetables.

The Round up

I’ve tried to group the entries into 5 categories – Soups, Bakes, Fruits, Sides and Others. Due to post length, I’ve split the round up into two posts. Part 1 will talk about Soups and Bakes.

Which one did you like?

Soups

A potato and carrot soup from Divya of Dil Se, just perfect for the chilly winter evenings.

Tigerfish of Teczape- An Escape of Food had something else in mind. She thought of a good heart-healthy seasonal soup for winter. Best way to use the seasonal produces in her Kale Winter Vegetable Soup with Salmon and Tofu.

Aoife of The Daily Spud found a little hope to cope with the ice cold winters of Ireland with this wonderful Ukranian soup called Borscht, which she learned from a cookery lesson in Moscow school cafeteria.

PJ of Ginger & Garlic has a thick and spicy soup to share with us, the name Parsnip soup with kale and roasted garlic says it all.

Sarah of Maison Cupcake, UK has a healthy and ‘immediate’ soup to cater in this winter, the Immediate Butternut Squash and Chestnut Soup is good deal to pamper your taste buds.

Though that’s not what we mean when we say ‘soup’, but the Mango Cauliflower Rasam from Ruchika of Ruchika Cooks is a must have for all of us who would like to drink healthy this winter.

Bakes

With winter, comes Christmas bells and with comes the delicious Christmas cakes. Happy Cook of My Kitchen Treasure has something special to share, it’s a Cranberry upside down cake.

Joanne of Eats Well With Others took a new year resolution of not bringing back breads to home, the only breads allowed inside her kitchen are the ones prepared solely by her. Here’s her first step. She sends an amazing Fried Eggs on Toast with Cheddar and Avocado.

This French lady, Gaelle of WhatAreYouFeedingYourKidsTheseDays is happy to serve her family with a simple yet delicious dish, the Gratin of Baked Winter Vegetables. It’s an adapted version of a very traditional French dish that was perfect for the freezing temperatures of Philadelphia: a Gratin Dauphinois (baked potatoes).

Meeta of What’s For Lunch, Honey? sent a lovely looking Kohlrabi Turnip Gratin, never thought turnip would look so tempting.

Saveur from The Taste Space has a wholesome dessert to serve – Apple Cranberry Oat Crumble.

Nandini of Usha Nandini’s Recipes dared to add some oranges to her biscuits, and look what she has got – flower shaped Orange Biscuits (note the beautiful orange tinge).

Further Reading: Think Spice -Think Turmeric, Eggs, Festival of Rice Part 1, Part 2, Sweet Tooth, Non Veggie

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Potpourri: The Carnival of Bengali Cuisine #1

Cook Like a Bong completed 100,000 pageviews in its new avatar. Plus, our Facebook page crossed 160 fans [of which, 100 came in last 3 weeks!]. OMG, can’t stop smiling. 🙂

Celebration

Celebration

In retrospect, I could see several factors contributing to it, but the discussion deserves a separate post. So, moving on…

To mark the occasion [1 lakh pageviews in 6 months and 100 facebook fans in 3 weeks], we’re starting a new series – Potpourri.

Potpourri: Carnival of Bengali Cuisine

Literally, Potpourri means an assortment of several [incongruous] items. Starting today, every fortnight we plan to share the most interesting ‘discoveries’ [links of course :)] related to bengali food on the internet. Please pass on any interesting link that you come across (over email, comments or facebook).

Whats different from an Event?

Well, many things. For starters, in events we talk about only one aspect of food – recipes. And there too, only the recipes posted on blogs. Even then, several event organizers required you to ‘repost’ the content for participation [never really understood the reason for this extra work]. Thats quite a convoluted requirement and misses an entire gamut of online resources.

Thus, generally events miss several interesting aspects of food – food in movies, literature and music, memoirs, influences, popular culture, restaurants and (unfortunately) the chef.

Potpourri will try and talk about these related aspects – with a single minded focus on Bengali food. We’ll start with a biweekly (once in 2 weeks) post on the interesting reads in several categories. Initially, we expect that most of these links would come from usual browsing (Sudeshna’s and mine). However, we expect that as the series picks up momentum a couple of months later, several of our readers would contribute.

Here we go with the first edition of Potpourri.

Popular Culture

The Telegraph had an article on 50 reasons not marry a Bengali man back in October. Predictably, #1 was his hatred for every fish but Ilish (Hilsa). Another reason was ‘men actually look down on women for chewing fishbones‘. Of the 50 reasons, 20+ were food related. The article became an instant hit and did rapid online rounds. Last Sunday, they came out with.. No prizes for guessing.. 50 reasons not marry a Bengali woman. Could you read and tell how many reasons are related to food?

In my backyard

Andy De talks about his sojourn with Aaheli at Peerless Inn in Kolkata [the post is almost 3 yrs old]. The Bangali Bhadrolok ambiance attracts him and so does the delicacies served (which inlcudes Kacha Aamer Sharbot, Bhetki Paturi and Morolla Maacher Bati Chorchori). Andy asserts that food is raison d’etre of Bengalis and that Bengalis are a tribe of Bon-Vivants (of refined tastes, esp. in food and drinks). Well, we can’t agree more.

City Bites

City Bites

City Bites

Bengalis residing outside Bengal used to crib about non availability of their favorite delicacies. And when they were available, it was either a bastardized version or extraordinarily costly. Well, not anymore. Several restaurants/eateries have opened shop across Bangalore, Delhi, Mumbai in recent years.

Kalyan Karmakar writes about his visit to Hangla’s, a bong eatery in Lokhandwala, Bandra, Mumbai. And here’s another take on the same food joint. Nishant Singh, in the post, says – Hangla is changla! Interestingly, both the reviews are quite different. Read it to appreciate the perspective of both sides.

Deccan Herald talks about a couple of Bengali restaurants in Bangalore. The news piece, however, misses Bhajo Hori Manna though, my personal favorite. Looks like I’ll have to take up the cudgels to review this wonderful restaurant.

Heritage

Dr. Bhaskar Dasgupta rediscovered his palate a year back. In this article, he examines the food and cuisine of Bengal in Colonial era. Interestingly, the Brits saahebs distinguished themselves from native bangalis by eating loads of meat. Read the article and Nation on a Platter: the Culture and Politics of Food and Cuisine in Colonial Bengal, by Jayanta Sengupta to know more.

Salivating Sight

Salivating Sight (Models: Sujit and Amit)

Impact

Your last Ilish Curry may only be a couple of years away. Jaideep Mazumdar explains in this Outlook article. The culprit – wrong timing of catching the fish. Ilish swims from the sea up a river to spawn.It lays eggs and gets back, and thats when it should be caught. But it’s usually caught on its journey from the sea to the river. This, plus the surge in the demand for Ilish during off season. Next stop? Ilish from Gujarat. But, can the bong taste bud appreciate Gujju Hilsa?

You can find the assortment of all these links in StumbleUpon profile of bengalicuisine. Check it out.

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Carnival of Salads

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High Calorie and Weight Gain

Festive season brings cheers, laughter and rendezvous with family and friends. It also brings High calorie foods and weight gain. The last month being the time for merriment and holidays, I’m sure most of you have put on some weight [due to the booze, the sloth, the endless party nibbles says this Telegraph article]. Most likely, you have made a New Year resolution (oh that annual word!) to have low calories healthy diet at least for next 2 months.

The rich and spicy food during the vacations calls for a month of non-spicy, non-greasy yet tasty food. Lets mark the next 1 month where we cook (and write about) Salads.

The Salad Carnival

In the next 30 days, lets write about Salads. Any type of Salad – green, entrée, barbecue, fruit salads. You can also write about Raitas  of any type – mixed, cucumber, fruits, boondi, or something different.

Rules for Participation

  • Write about a salad on your blog between now and 14th February 2010 with a link back to this event announcement. I’ll be glad if you use the event logo, it’s optional though.
  • Subscribe by email to this blog. Or, become a Fan at the Facebook page of Cook Like a Bong. Thanks in advance. 🙂 [Controversial I know.  So, testing]
  • The salad may be vegan, vegetarian or non-vegetarian.
  • If you have any archived post that you want to send, please update the post with the link to this event. No need to repost.
  • It is better if you can cite the type of salad that you have prepared, eg: green, entrée, barbecue, fruit salads
  • Please send in an image of the prepared recipe in jpeg format not more than 300X300pixels
  • Send in the following details to bengalicuisine@gmail.com with the subject as “Carnival of Salads
  • Your Preferred name:
  • Name of salad:
  • Type of salad:
  • URL of your blog: (In case you don’t have a blog, you can give any of your URL e.g. twitter, facebook/orkut/myspace profile etc)
  • URL of the post:
  • Image of the prepared recipe:
  • Those of you, who don’t have a blog, please feel free to email your recipes to the id above. Your recipe will be published at the time of round-up with due credit to you.

Most Popular Salad Video

Famous Los Angeles based restaurant chain Carl’s Jr has recently launched their new line of grilled chicken salad. Guess who’s featured in the ad? The sultry seductress Kim Kardashian. No prizes for guessing the reason. With close to 2 million views in just 3 weeks, its got to be the most popular salad video ever. Cranberry Apple Walnut Chicken Salad:

Etymology of Salad

‘Salad’ derives its name probably from the Latin word “sal” meaning salt, which was one of the important ingredients of salad. Wiki says that salads were probably eaten by the ancient Greeks and Romans even two thousand years ago. Though, most people avoided salads because of disease contamination from raw vegetables. Salads started growing in popularity during the 18th and 19th centuries with the emergence of various salad bars.

Types of Salad

Salads on the basis of their ingredients, dressing and the way they are made can be differentiated into various types. The very popular ones being the Ceasar salad, Greek salad, Italian chopped salad. Ms. Shulman wrote on the New York Times about five different salads which are a little different from the regular ones, the main ingredients being grains, beans, potatoes and eggs.

Whats your favourite salad?

We would love to hear more about salads from you, if you want then please share your thoughts and any related incidents with salads. You can put in a comment here or mail us at bengalicuisine@gmail.com .

Further Reading – All About Salads, Salad Recipes, How to avoid gaining weight during Christmas Holidays

By the way, do you know any Bengali Salad?

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Microwave Chocolate-Honey Spiral Cookies

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I just came across the event organized by Malar this month. It’s a lovely event, the theme tells you everything about it – Kitchen Disasters. Kitchen disasters are not a new thing in probably anybody’s kitchen, especially for those who recently got married or just moved away from home. When I started cooking a year and a half back even I faced such problems frequently. Kitchen mishaps have now gone down because of the practice, but of course it’s not extinct. But when it comes to baking I am always there to do some kind of mishaps. The main reason behind this probably lack of a proper baking oven. I always try to bake something in the microwave oven and it turns out to be awful. Just last month, after much searching on the internet I got hold of a youtube video which taught to bake a cake in a cup in the microwave. I followed the steps, and the result was horrible. The first one was hard like a stone with an entirely blackened core. One burnt cake could not turn me down, I tried with the other one – that was even worse than the first one, it looked like a cake, but couldn’t eat it. It was so spongy, that my sister and myself started pulling from both sides to tear it into two pieces.

I clicked an image of this disaster, and was waiting for the right time to publish this. And what better way can I find but to send the entry for an event. The burnt cake chapter never turned me down, and so I was again in search of something to bake in the microwave oven. This time it came to my google reader, a post on microwave cookies by Indrani. I was very happy to get this post. First, the post was from a very loving person. Second, the cookies were baked in the microwave oven. I followed almost the same way as Indrani’s but made a little change but preparing two types of dough – one with honey and the other with chocolate, just to bring a little color to the cookies. I used the Cadbury chocolate, broke them down into small pieces. The cookies, to my utter happiness turned out to be good, at least not burnt or having some disastrous textures. But, they were a little hard which was probably because of over baking them. When I asked Indrani about it she said to Microwave the cookies for a less time.

Makes 30 cookies

Preparation time 1hr 15min

Baking time 3-4min

Ingredients:

All purpose flour (Maida): 3 cups

Butter (Makhan): 100gms, at room temperature

White sugar (Chini): ¾ cup

Honey (Madhu): ½ cup

Egg (Dim): 1, beaten well

Almond (Kath badam): A handful, coarsely chopped

Chocolate chips: 90gm

Preparation:

  • Divide all the ingredients except honey, and chocolate into two equal parts

For the honey dough:

  • Mix butter, honey and half the sugar and heat it over low flame till the sugar gets dissolved, keep it aside to cool to room temperature

For the chocolate dough:

  • Mix butter, chocolate chips, and the rest of the sugar and heat it over low flame with constant stirring till the sugar and chocolate dissolves, keep aside until cooled

  • Pour half the egg into the honey mix and the rest into the chocolate mix, fold well
  • Pour the two mixes separately into two halves of the flour and make into two firm dough
  • Refrigerate the two dough after wrapping them with plastic film for an hour or so
  • Take the two dough and roll them into a half-inch thick circles, now put the chocolate one over the honey mix dough and roll them together
  • Cut the roll laterally into half-inch thick cookies and place them on a microwave safe plate

  • Microwave high (800watts for my MW) for 3-4 mins; let them cool inside the microwave oven. Keep in an air tight jar and feast on them whenever you feel like.

Hot Tips – When baked in the microwave oven, the cookies start getting baked from the centre, so check the cookies in between baking once to make sure they don’t get over baked.

Further ReadingMicrowave Honey Lemon Pistachio Cookies, Microwave Peanut Butter Cookies

Amount Per Serving (1 cookie)

  • Calories 59
  • Calories from Fat  24
  • Polyunsaturated Fat 0.3g
  • Monounsaturated Fat  1.4g
  • Cholesterol 3mg
  • Sodium 28mg
  • Total Carbohydrates 8.2g
  • Dietary Fiber 0.2g
  • Protein 0.6g

Sending this post to Malar Gandhi for hosting a wonderful event  –Kitchen Disasters.

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Dim Posto-Sarse (Egg with poppy-mustard paste )

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“Jai Mata Di”

This is the first post of this New Year at Cook Like a Bong. I wish you had a wonderful weekend. Mine was good too. I went out for a short trip to the Himalayas, specifically to Vaishna Devi. For those who are not aware of this holy Hindu shrine, let me give you a little information. The shrine is one of the holiest temples among Hindus, and one of the few temples where the Goddess is worshipped not in the form of any idol but just a little piece of rock. The shrine is located in the Northern State of Jammu & Kashmir and is a 13km trek from a little hill town called Katra. Vaishno Devi or Mata Rani is a manifestation of the mother goddess. As with all Hindu temples and shrines, the Vaishno Devi temple also has some mythological significance, to know more about those stories here.

Amidst a cloud covered sky we reached Katra. The following morning was our trek to the shrine, but the rains and cold were about to wash out everything. Fighting with all natural hazards we still could make out to our destination with a 6 hour trek – walking and by pony at times. The cloud and fog never let us have a view of the mountains, and we were almost heart broken. The aarti and visit to the shrine was a divine experience. After a long and tiring journey, a visit to the temple really had its charming effect. All done, we were to head back again the next morning. Thanks to the all night rain and little snowfall, the next morning was a wonderful experience. We started our journey when it was still dark, and could see the first rays of sun slowly falling over the snow capped mountain. I have watched this very scene many times at different places, but the first ray of sun turning the snow to gold is always a mesmerizing view. We took a helicopter to come down. It was to save time and also to have a once in a lifetime experience in a helicopter. The trip lasted just 3 days with loads of troubles including cancelled flight, lost items in the flight cargo, rains, cold, wet sweaters, walking bare foot on the ice cold stone steps – these incidents made me feel really bad. But while writing this post, I realized I really enjoyed the trip.

Coming back to food, I just thought of writing about this egg in mustard-poppy paste recipe. I had clicked the photo quite some time back, and was waiting for the right time to post it. The first post for this year, rather this decade seemed to be exactly the right time for it. It is an easy recipe and can be had be one and all.

Serves 4

Preparation time 10min

Cooking time 30min


Ingredients:

Egg (Dim): 4

Potato (Alu): 1, large

Mustard seed (Sarse): 4 tablespoon

Poppy seed (Posto): 4 tablespoon

Onion (Peyaj): 1, medium

Turmeric powder (Hau guro): ½ teaspoon

Chili powder (Lanka guro): 1 teaspoon

Mustard oil (Sarser tel): 10-12 tablespoon

Garam masala: ½ teaspoon

Salt to taste

Preparation:

Preparation:

  • Hard boil the eggs, chop the onions finely, slice the potatoes into long pieces, make a paste of mustard and poppy seeds together
  • Heat the half the amount of oil in and fry the chopped onions, keep aside
  • In the same left over oil fry the eggs, keep aside
  • Pour in left over oil and fry the potatoes till half fried
  • In the mean time, mix the chili and turmeric powder to the mustard-poppy paste
  • As the potatoes get half cooked, pour in the spices and little water, cook till the potatoes are almost done
  • Carefully put in the eggs and cook for 2-3mins more, pour in the garam masala powder,  and take out of flame, garnish with the fried onions
  • Serve hot with warm rice

Hot Tips- If you want to make the gravy spicier then add some more mustard and poppy seeds to the paste.

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