Khandvi: Gujrati Snack

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I have a good news to share with all of you. Palki, the only online Bengali magazine has recently published their 8th edition. Some of the photographs clicked by me and Kalyan, and also a recipe (Titor dal) have been published in this edition.

I had been utterly busy with my assignments and classes. The exams are knocking at the door and loads and loads of syllabus to cover. But, the majority of the day am playing Farmville in FaceBook and may be a little of going through the texts. I have almost forgotten the route to our kitchen. This Khandvi recipe was in drafts for quite a long time now.

Khandvi is one of the typical Gujrati dishes that I just adore. It is a wholesome meal so as to say, with chickpea flour and sour curd and very little oil, Khandvi is just the best idea for those who are on diet and also for those of us who just love food.

Makes: 20 pieces
Cooking Time: 15 -20 minutes + 15 minutes for making into rolls
Preparation Time: 5 minutes

Khandvi

Makes: 20 -25 pieces
Cooking Time: 15 -20 minutes + 15 minutes for making into rolls
Preparation Time: 5 minutes

Ingredients:

Chickpea flour (Besan): 1 cup

Sour yogurt (Tauk doi): 1 cup

Water (Jal): 2 cups

Green chili paste (Kancha lanka bata): 1 teaspoon

Turmeric powder (Halud guro): ¼ teaspoon

Mustard seed (Sarse): ½ teaspoon

Cumin seed (Jeera): ½ teaspoon

Curry leaves (Kari pata): 5-6

Grated coconut (Narkel kora): 2 tablespoons

Chopped coriander (Dhane pata): 2 tablespoons

Vegetable oil (Sada tel): 2 tablespoons

Salt to taste

Preparation:

  • Whisk the yogurt, water and chickpea flour.
  • Add green chili and ginger paste, turmeric powder and salt. Whisk until well blended.
  • Pour in the mixture in a non-stick pan and heat on low flame with constant stirring to prevent formation of lumps
  • Continue till the mixture thickens , approximately for 10-15mins
  • Spread the hot mixture on the back of a steel plate as thinly as possible, with a flat spatula (preferably wooden).
  • When you have finished spreading the batter, allow it to cool a little and settle down.
  • Cut the spread into 2 inch thick long strips, and try rolling these strips length wise
  • Place the cut rolls on a serving dish.
  • Heat oil in a wok
  • Toss in mustard seeds, cumin seeds, wait till they start cracking; add the curry leaves
  • Sprinkle the seasoning over the khandvi and garnish with coriander leaves and coconut.

Khaman Khandvi

Hot tips – You can also spread the chickpea flour mixture over a clean black stone table of your kitchen. Be patient while rolling the khandvis, because they tend to break.

Further ReadingSabjimata’s Khandvi

Sending this tasty snacks to Festive snacks of Navratri & Diwali hosted by Indrani.

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Lau Chingri

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November has set in but there is no trace of the wintery wind. Kolkata is still in the midst of the heat. According to reports it says a cyclone named Phyan has its effect for this warm weather in the mid of November. Though it spared the Western coast of the country, it is having quite a good and warm effect over the Eastern coastline. To beat this heat and also because of my diabetic problems bottle gourd is one of the most enlisted vegetables in our to-buy list. Whenever I visit the market these days I get hold of a lau (Bengali for bottle gourd) or lauki. The previous day I prepared lau-chingri, one of my favorite preparations with this not-so-tasty veggie.

Lau Chingri

Bottle gourd is a very beneficial vegetable. It reduces stomach acidity, indigestion and ulcers. The gourd is not only rich in essential minerals, iron, protein and trace elements; it is also rich in fiber. Fiber helps in preventing constipation and other digestive disorders like flatulence and piles. It also helps in urinary disorders, and overcoming jaundice. Cooked bottle gourd is anti-bilious and prevents excessive loss of sodium, quenches thirst and helps in preventing fatigue. With all these beneficial effects to the digestive system bottle gourd is one of the best choices to beat this November heat.

Serves: 4

Preparation time: 10min

Cooking time 20min

Ingredients:

Bottle gourd (Lau/ Lauki): 500gms

Prawns (Chingri): 150gms, deveined and de-shelled

Green chili (Kancha Lanka): 3-4, longitudinally slit

Mustard oil (Sarser tel): 2 tablespoon

Nigella (Kalo jeera): 1 teaspoon

Turmeric powder (Halud guro): ½ teaspoon

Coriander leaves (Dhane pata): For garnishing (optional)

lau chingri preparation

Preparation:

  • Chop the bottle gourd into 2 inch by half-inch size pieces
  • Wash and put it in a pressure cooker with water, just to cover the bottle gourd
  • Allow two whistles in the pressure cooker before putting off the flame. Drain out the excess water
  • Wash the shrimps well, and drain out the excess water
  • Heat the oil in a wok and fry the shrimps gently till they turn a little hard, take out of flame and keep aside
  • Into the same oil add the nigella seeds and wait till they start popping
  • Throw in the half-boiled bottle gourd, green chili, turmeric powder and the fried prawns
  • Put a lid over the wok and cook till the bottle gourd is cooked properly, stir at times
  • Garnish with some chopped coriander leaves
  • Take out of flame and serve with warm white rice

Lau chingri

Hot Tips – Always try to get the green colored bottle gourd, the whitish skinned bottle gourds are a bitter in taste. Those who don’t like to add prawns to this preparation just leave out the prawns, you can also add some fried boris as garnish.

Further Reading – Bong Mom’s Lau-chingri preparation, Indrani’s Lau-chingri

Nutritional Facts –

Calories 9KJ

Total Fat 0.1 g 0%
Saturated Fat 0 g 0%
Cholesterol 0 mg 0%
Sodium 0%
Total Carbs 2 g 1%
Dietary Fiber 0.9 g 4%
Protein 0.3 g 1%

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Dahi Vada

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The starting time of the parade is actually determined by the

length of time of the traditional brunch

-Charlie Brotman

Sundays are meant to be fun days. Since, childhood Sundays were the day to visit my grandpa and of course no-study-day. That made the day more special. On Sunday mornings there was an array of cartoons telecasted on TV those days. Alice in Wonderland, Jungle Book was my favorites. Ma used to serve a heavy breakfast on Sundays and that mostly included luchi, tarakari (Bengali for vegetable curry) and sweets.

Visiting grandpa has long stopped, grandpa passed years before. Nobody watches DD National these days, and I presume they don’t telecast cartoons any more these days. But, having a heavy breakfast that can almost be called a brunch is still a custom at home. Today I thought of having a little different from the usual Sunday brunches and so Dahi vada was in the menu today.

Dahi Vada

Makes 10 medium sized vadas

Preparation time: 15min

Cooking time: 15min

Ingredients:

Dahi Vada mix (I used the Gits Dahi Vada mix): 1 packet

Plain yogurt (Tauk doi): 200gms

Ginger paste (Ada bata): 1 teaspoon

Raisins (Kismis): 10-12

Water (Jal): 2 cups

Cumin seeds (Jeera): 1 tablespoon

Tamarind chutney (Tetuler chutney): ½ cup

Coriander leaves chopped (Dhane pata): 2 tablespoon

Bhujiya: 1 small packet

Sunflower/vegetable oil (Sada tel): For frying

Gits Dahi Vada Mix

Preparation:

  • Roast the cumin seeds and grind into powder, keep aside
  • Empty the dahi vada mix in a large bowl and put in the ginger paste, mix well
  • Add the raisins and water to prepare a not-very-runny mixture
  • Keep the batter aside for 10-15 mins
  • Heat oil in a frying pan, and take one lathe of the batter and gently pour it over the oil, fry both sides of the vada till they turn light brown
  • Keep a deep bowl filled with water beside the gas oven, drop the fried vadas into this water and take out after a minute
  • Squeeze the excess water by pressing those with both your palms, and keep aside
  • Place the vada in a plate
  • Stir the yogurt with half-a-cup of water, add a pinch of salt and pour the yogurt over the vada
  • Garnish with cumin powder, chopped coriander leaves, tamarind chutney, and bhujiya .

Dahi Vada

Hot Tips – I have used a ready mix for making the vadas, but you can also prepare it at home. Soak urad dal overnight, and then grind to a fine paste. The other preparation remains the same.

Further Links – Dahi Vada by Sunananda

Please do remember to send in your recipes for the Think Spice: Think Turmeric event ending November 30th, 2009.

Think-Spice

I am sending the Dahi Vada recipe to Monthly Mingle: Brunch hosted by MeetaK of What’s For Lunch Honey.

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October Monthly Round and Event Announcement

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October was a month of festivities. October brought in the Goddess Durga back to her father’s home in a four day festivity with loads of pomp and grandeur.  Then came the goddess of wealth, Lakshmi. Lakshmi is worshiped in every household on the Purnima (full moon night) of the month of Ashwin. Just a few days after was the time for Diwali and Kali Puja. Cracking fireworks and lighting the oil lamps is an integral part of this festival. I celebrated Diwali in Bangalore this time. With all these festivities, Cook Like a Bong had only 5 posts for this month including 4 authentic Bengali recipes.

October Roundup_Compressed

Here’s a summary of activities last month at the blog.

We also took part in some of the ongoing events for this month:

We are also co-hosting the 7-stages of life event at Radhika’s blog.

In the month of November we are very glad to host the Think Spice event, the brain child of Sunita of Sunita’s World fame. This month’s theme is Turmeric, so it’s Think Spice: Think Turmeric.

Turmeric is a spice had been grown in India since 3000 B.C. It grows in the hot and humid climate and so the climate of South-Eastern Asia is most suited for the cultivation of turmeric, though it is grown widely in different parts of the world. It is cultivated primarily in Bengal, China, Taiwan, Sri Lanka, Java, Peru, Australia and the West Indies. It is almost impossible to imagine an Indian delicacy (other than desserts) without turmeric. This spice has been widely used in various cuisines also all over the world. When Sunita asked me choose the spice for this event, it was very simple to choose, the most widely used spice of this sub-continent was not in the list of the previous hosts and so I chose Turmeric or haldi.

Some health facts about turmeric:

  • Turmeric is a known antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-carcinogenic agent.
  • Turmeric stimulates digestion, supports the liver, and reduces intestinal permeability.
  • It is taken in some Asian countries as a dietary supplement, which helps in stomach problems and other ailments.
  • Curcumin slows the development and growth of a number of types of cancer including prostate cancer. Turmeric may also slow the rate at which hormone-responsive prostate cancer becomes resistant to hormonal therapy.
  • It is also a good source of Vitamin C and Magnesium, and a very good source of Dietary Fiber, Vitamin B6, Iron, Potassium and Manganese.

Other names:

Indian: haldi, halud, arishina, pasupu, manjal
French: curcuma, saffron des Indes
German: Gelbwurz
Italian; curcuma
Spanish: curcuma
Arabic: kharkoum
Burmese: fa nwin
Chinese: wong geung fun
Indian: haldee, haldi, huldee, huldie
Indonesian: kunjit, kunyit
Malay: kunjit
Sinhalese: kaha
Tamil: munjal
Thai: kamin

The rules for this event are very simple, prepare anything (vegetarian or non-vegetarian) with turmeric in it and send your entry to bengalicuisine@gmail.com with the subject line as “Think Spice: Think Turmeric”.

You can also send in your older archived posts for the event just update the post with the link to this event (you need not repost the old post) and also a link to Sunita’s blog.

Please also add the following details in the mail:

Your Name:
Your Blog Name:
Name of the Dish:
Link/URL of the Post:
Attach a Picture of the Dish. Size 300 x 300.

Think Spice: Think TurmericPlease feel free to use this logo.

The deadline for the event is November 30, 2009 12 midnight at your time zone.

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