Broken egg for Click

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A fort night back I had posted with a week’s resource of “Breakfast with egg”. Egg is the best way to have a wholesome and yummy breakfast. Out of these recipes the Mughlai Paratha recipe has become an instant hit.

Talking about eggs, I am sending this photo to Jugalbandi’s Click contest for this month, the theme being Bicolor.

Broken egg

Broken egg

Camera Model:  Nikon D60
F-stop: F/5.6
Exposure time: 1/60 sec
ISO Speed: ISO-200
Focal Length: 55mm
Photo editing: I did a little auto contrast to the image using Picassa.
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Prepare Phuchka (Golgappa) at home

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“When people wore hats and gloves, nobody would dream of eating on the street. Then white gloves went out of style and, suddenly, eating just about anything in the street became OK.”

–          Jane Addison, quoted in the Great Food Almanac by Irena Chalmers

Street food in Kolkata epitomizes the pada (neighborhood) culture. Having something at the nearest roadside vendor is not only about eating and fulfilling ones gastronomic urges, but it is also a means of having food with family, friends and sometimes even strangers. Street foods that are in vogue are phuchka, jhal muri, papri chat, muri makha, vegetable chop, and beguni, but phuchka ranks above all. Someone from South Calcutta won’t find it a pain to travel all the way to Bowbazar (for the uninitiated in Calcutta’s geography, Bowbazar is almost an hour drive from South Calcutta) just to confront his friends that the phuchka wala at his pada is better than theirs.

Now, by “street food”, I don’t mean what one can get in the big or even the small restaurants, roadside food is that what you get from the makeshift stalls on the foot path of whole of Bengal. There are also other names for it in the different states of India. Some call it Pani Puri, some golgappa. But if you ask any Calcuttan he/she will say phuchka is definitely different from golgappa or panipuri. The difference may be obscure, probably it’s only the colloquial term that varies, but there is a little difference in one of the ingredients that significantly differentiates phuchka from all its synonyms. The vendors in Bengal use gandhoraj lebu (a typical lemon produced in suburbs of Bengal) to flavor the filling and the tamarind water of phuchka. And this is where all the difference is.

DSC_0971

Kolkata street food is such a rage, that there are places in different part of India and even abroad holding “Calcutta street food festival”. When I started having phuchka, as far as I remember it was 5 for a rupee and the last time I had it back in Kolkata I got three for two rupees. Though here in Bangalore there are places where you get pani puri that almost tastes like those back in Kolkata, but are highly priced. Talking about phuchka, I can’t leave the phuckhwalas, people who sell the phuchka. They are mostly from Bihar/Jharkhand, and you just can’t beat them with their style of the phuchka preparation.

Cooking time: 8-10min

Preparation time: 12min

Makes 20 phuchka

Ingredients:

  • Phuchka balls: 20
  • Potato(Alu): 2 large
  • Whole Bengal gram (Chola): 2 tablespoon, soaked
  • Green chili (Kacha Lanka): 4, chopped finely
  • Cumin (Jeera): 1 teaspoon, roasted and then grinded
  • Lemon juice (Pati lebu ras): 1 teaspoon
  • Cilantro (Dhane pata): Chopped to 2 tablespoon
  • Tamarind pulp (Tetul): 4 tablespoon
  • Salt to taste

Preparation:

  • Boil the potatoes with the skin on, peel off after boiling and mash properly so that no lumps remain
  • Add soaked bengal gram green chili, cumin powder, lemon juice, one tablespoon of cilantro to the mashed potato and mix well
  • Take the tamarind pulp in a big bowl and add 2 cups of water to it with salt and the rest of the cilantro, mix well
  • Add 2 tablespoon of the tamarind water to the mashed potatoes and keep the rest aside
  • Break just the upper part of one phuchka ball and put in one teaspoon of the filling, fill the other balls also similarly
  • Serve with the rest of the tamarind water
Phuchka with tamarind water

Phuchka with tamarind water

Hot Tips – Though not the basic component, you may also like to add some chopped onions to the filling to make it spicier.

Further Reading – Rasta Nasta, Sasta way, Crazy Street Food of Kolkata

Phuchka is the ideal recipe to send for the “Family Recipe” event at The Life and Loves of Grumpy Honey Bunch co-hosted by Laura of The Spiced Life.

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Bhapa Chingri

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Doc: You shouldn’t eat Fish, it’ll cause you acidity.

Bong Patient: No problem S(a)ir, I’ll take an antacid afterwards

–          A joke on a typical Bong’s love for fish

Well, you can’t keep off a Bengali from fish for too long, can you? After the series on Breakfast with Egg, it time to go back to Fish. Chingri Bhaape is on the platter today.

Grinding of the spices to a paste just before preparing the dish is a typical of the Bengali recipes. We prefer the freshly prepared spices more than the preserved dry spice powder. Even while preparing Chingri Bhaape, I used a paste of mustard seeds (aka shorshe, sorshe, sarshe).

Chingri Bhape with steamed rice

Chingri Bhape with steamed rice

Chingri Bhaape is an authentic Bangali recipe, and had been prepared in every household since ages. It is enjoyed best with warm white rice. The pungent taste of mustard paste makes the sarshe chingri bhaapa even more appealing. Hilsa is also used similarly to prepare ilish bhapa.

Preparation time: 10 mins

Cooking time: 5 – 8mins

Serves: 4

Ingredients:

  • Tiger Prawns (Chingri Maach): ½ kg, cleaned and deveined
  • Mustard seed (Sarse): 5 tablespoons, ground with 1 tablespoon water to make a paste
  • Turmeric powder (Halud guro): ½ teaspoon
  • Mustard oil (Sarser tel): 3 tablespoon
  • Green chili (Kacha Lanka):  5 – 6
  • Salt to taste

Preparation:

  • In a heat proof bowl, that has a lid (better to use a steel tiffin box) put all the ingredients together  and mix well
  • Close the lid and put it in a double boiler (bain marie) to cook for 5 minutes, check if the prawns have become tender, else cook for sometime more till the prawns are tender
  • Take it out and serve with warm rice

Hot Tips – Cut the back of the prawn with a knife and take out the dorsal vein completely. It is the main cause of food poisoning due to prawns.

Alternative cooking – Along with the above ingredients mentioned you can also put in two tablespoons of freshly desiccated coconut. You can also cook it in a pressure cooker. Lace the steel box inside a pressure cooker and fill it with one-inch of water and wait till the first whistle.

Bhapa Chingri

Bhapa Chingri

Double boiler-If you don’t own a double boiler, here’s a workaround. Just place the box in a deep pan and fill the pan with water upto a little below the lid of the box.

Further Readings-Shorshe Chingri Bhapa, Chingrir Malaikari

Sending this recipe to Indrani of Appyayan for hosting the first event on her blog, Spotlight: Fish.

Fish-logo

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Egg Roll

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“A true friend is someone who thinks that you are a good egg even though he knows that you are slightly cracked” – Bernard Meltzer

The final recipe for the “Breakfast with eggs” series is Egg roll. I’ve posted six different easy to cook and quick egg recipes for the morning meal. Previous posts in the series:

  1. Mughlai Paratha
  2. French Toast
  3. Scrambled Eggs
  4. Banana Pancake
  5. Boiled Egg Sandwich

But I just couldn’t finish the series without a little flavor from the street food of Calcutta (Kolkata). Though many different Asian countries claim for the origin of this dish and among them southern China has the most number of votes, but this particular preparation very well known to everybody who hails from Kolkata or even those who had a visit to the city is typically from the make shift stalls on Kolkata foot paths.

Egg roll

Egg rol

There was one such stall near my dance school called Iceberg (quite contradictory for a joint that sold everything hot), and every month it was a ritual for our gang of friends to have an egg roll from there. I still remember it cost just seven rupees then, but still that was quite expensive for a school-going girl like me. At home, outside food was a taboo and so I always had to cook some stories to have those egg rolls. But alas, eventually mom found out my secret and instead of scolding me I was offered with two egg rolls the next day at tiffin, of course prepared by my mom in her kitchen. School days have passed a long time ago, but I still can’t forget the taste of those road side egg rolls, though my mom’s were quite similar but not that good. My father suggested that the dirt from the road made it taste better.

The egg roll in Kolkata is similar to Frankie of Mumbai and resembles the kathi rolls prepared in many roadside stalls throughout India. Egg roll in Kolkata was probably first introduced by Nizam’s, a very popular restaurant in Kolkata serving Mughlai dishes. Another famous joint serving egg roll in Kolkata is Haji Saheb in Behala (Hazi Saheb for some), it’s my personal request, don’t miss it if you ever visit this place.

Preparation time: 10mins

Cooking time: 8mins

Serves: 2

Ingredients:

  • Whole wheat flour (Maida): 1 cup
  • Eggs (Dim): 2
  • Onion (Peyaj): 1 medium, chopped finely
  • Cucumber (Sasha): one-half of a medium sized, julienned
  • Green chili (Kacha lanka): 2, chopped
  • Sunflower oil (Sada tel) for frying
  • Salt to taste
  • Tomato sauce for seasoning

Preparation:

  • Knead the flour well and make two round paratha with it
  • Beat the eggs with little salt
  • Heat one tablespoon of oil in a frying pan and add one beaten egg to it, spread it so as to have almost the same diameter as the parantha
  • Carefully place the parantha over the half fried omelet and allow it to cook for two more minutes, turn around the paratha and cook the other side for one minute and take out from the frying pan
  • Place the egg covered paratha on a flat surface with the egg side up
  • Add chopped cucumber, chilies and onion at the centre of the paratha to make the filling and pour the tomato sauce over the vegetables
  • Roll the paratha and cover half of it with an aluminum foil or kitchen paper and tuck the paper well so that the roll doesn’t open up
  • Serve hot with little lemon juice over the filling

Hot tips – You can put in a filling of mashed potatoes seasoned with chili powder and salt or even a filling with chicken or mutton kebab tastes great.

What variety of Egg Roll do you prefer?

Further reading – Nizam’s Kathi Roll, When in Kolkata, Egg Paratha

Nutrition calculator – 1 egg roll

Calories 580
Total Carbohydrate 46gms
Dietary fiber 3.9gms
Protein 35gm
Total fat 28gms
Cholesterol 365mg
Sugar 2gms
Vitamin A 20%
Vitamin C 0%
Iron 10%
Calcium 8%

Sending this to NTTC#5 event hosted by Sneh of Gel’s Kitchen.

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Boiled Egg Sandwich

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“Life is like a sandwich – the more you add to it, the better it becomes.”Anonymous

Continuing the series on Breakfast with Egg Recipes, we’ll talk about Boiled Egg Sandwich today. [Part 1 was Mughlai Paratha, Part 2 was French Toast, Part 3 was Scrambled Eggs and Part 4 was Banana Pancake].

DSC_0876

Sandwich with chips

Sandwich became popular among the European aristocrats during the late 17th century as a late night meal. But the first use of the word “sandwich” was mentioned much later in 19th century. It was named after John Montagu, 4th Earl of Sandwich. During Montagu’s long hours of gambling he used to order meat in between two bread slices so as not to grease his hands and spoil the cards. Others saw this, got inspired and started ordering for the same food, eventually calling it sandwich.

As the quote above says, it is very true that the better the filling of the sandwich better is its feeling. The one I prepared was a very simple and quick to cook sandwich. You can check this other variation of egg sandwich. Poached egg seasoned with peppercorn and salt can also be used as a sandwich filling.

Preparation time: 6 mins

Cooking time: 10 mins

Serves: 2

Ingredients:

–          Bread slices (Pauruti): 6

–          Eggs (Dim): 3

–          Freshly grounded peppercorn for seasoning

–          Salt to taste

–          Cheese/ Butter or other fat spread

Preparation:

  • Hard boil the eggs, and throw away the shell.
  • Mash the eggs with a fork or potato masher and season accordingly with peppercorn and salt
  • Spread each bread slice with softened butter
  • Spread the mashed eggs over 3 of the bread slices and press lightly with the other three
  • Cut the sandwiches diagonally and serve with chips or tomato sauce
Boiled Egg Sandwich

Boiled Egg Sandwich

Hot Tips – The ideal time to prepare hard boiled eggs is 10mins and then keep those for sometime in cold flowing water. If you want to have a soft boiled egg then just cook for 6 – 8 mins. I used whole wheat bread to prepare the sandwiches; the nutrition count is based on that.

Further readings – Egg potato sandwich, Different sandwich fillings

Nutrition Calculator – 1 sandwich

Calories 300
Total Carbohydrate 13.7gms
Dietary fiber 1.9gms
Protein 22.7gm
Total fat 16.9gms
Cholesterol 635mg
Sugar 3.6gms
Vitamin A 20%
Vitamin C 0%
Iron 10%
Calcium 8%

Sandwich on way to Divya’s yummy event on “Show me your sandwich” ,  NTTC#5 event hosted by Sneh of Gel’s Kitchen and to Neha’s blog for the event CFK: Healthy Lunch boxes.

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Banana Pancake

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“In a big family the first child is kind of like the first pancake. If it’s not perfect, that’s okay, there are a lot more coming along. ” – Antonin Scalia

Continuing the series on Breakfast with Egg Recipes, we’ll talk about Pancake today, Banana Pancake to be precise. [Part 1 was Mughlai Paratha, Part 2 was French Toast and Part 3 was Scrambled Eggs].

What we call pancakes today might have originated more than two millennia ago. It wasn’t like the ones served at our dining table, but was a concoction (mixture) of milk, flour, eggs, and spices, and was called “Alita Dolcia” (Latin for “another sweet”) by the ancient Romans. They were probably prepared on flat rocks smeared with grease. The modern day pancakes were invented in Medieval Europe.

Banana Pancake

Banana Pancake

Pancake is also called: hotcakes, griddlecakes, or flapjacks in US and Canada; pannekoek in Afrikaans community; Apom Balik in Malay; Ban Chian Kuih in Chinese; chatamaari in Nepal; Blini in Russia.

There are numerous variations of Pancake prepared in different cuisines, based on changes in ingredients (flour, eggs and milk remain constant, rest vary) the cooking implements (flat rocks, hearths, griddles, microwave oven), the look and taste of the final product (thick or thin, spicy or sweet).

In India too, there are several variations of pancake – pitha (or pithy) in Bengal and Assam, Dosa in South, Meetha Pooda in Punjab.  We’ll prepare yet another variation, Banana Pancake, today. Get ready for a sweet sensation to the taste buds.

Preparation time:  5 mins

Cooking time: 8 mins

Serves: 2

Ingredients:

  • Flour (Maida): ½ cup
  • Banana (Kala): 1, mashed properly
  • Egg (Dim): 1
  • Milk (Dudh): ½ cup
  • Baking powder: ½ teaspoon
  • Sugar (Chini): 1 tablespoon
  • Butter/ Clarified butter (Makhan/ Ghee): 1 teaspoon
  • Cherry: 6 /7, chopped coarsely
  • Cinnamon powder (Dar chini guro): ¼ teaspoon (optional)
  • Vegetable oil (Sada tel): 6 teaspoon
  • Salt: ½ teaspoon

Preparation:

  • Take a large bowl, sift the flour in it, put in the other dry ingredients and mix
  • Add the mashed banana , milk, butter and chopped cherries, and whisk to make a smooth batter
  • Heat one and half teaspoon on oil on a pan and pour in one-fourth of the batter
  • Fry one side of the pan cake till it becomes golden brown, turn the other side and fry similarly
  • Fry three more pan cakes with the batter
Banana Pancake with toppings

Banana Pancake with toppings

Hot Tips: Banana pan cakes taste great with freshly sliced banana and honey or maple syrup. Along with mashed bananas, other soft fruits like mango, strawberries, blue berries can also be added to the batter. Fruitless pan cakes can also be made; it depends on what you want to put in.

Further Reading – Mango Nutella Pancake, Easy Pancake, Besan ka puda, Banana Pancake Trail

Nutrtion Count – 2 Banana Pancakes

Calories 240
Total fat 7 gms
Total Carbohydarte 41gms
Cholesterol 20mg
Dietary fibre 2gms
Sugar 9gms
Protein 5gm
Vitamin A 2% Vitamin C 8%
Calcium 8%
Iron 15%
Sending this to NTTC#5 event hosted by Sneh of Gel’s Kitchen and also to the event Heart of the Matter hosted by Michelle, this month’s theme being “Budget-Friendly Foods.” .

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Scrambled Eggs

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“Twenty-four-hour room service generally refers to the length of time that it takes for the club sandwich to arrive. This is indeed disheartening, particularly when you’ve ordered scrambled eggs.”

Fran Lebowitz

Looks like the series Breakfast with Egg recipes is well received by the readers. Each of Part 1 (Mughlai Paratha) and Part 2 (French Toast) has received over 50 views. Thanks for the encouragement. Continuing the series, this post will talk about Scrambled Eggs (Jhudi bhaja, or Dimer Bhujia in Bengali).

Scrambled egg

Scrambled egg

Interestingly, scrambled egg was the alternate name for Beatles record winning song “Yesterday” from the album Help! I couldn’t figure out why Paul McCartney named the song so. Talking about origin of scrambled egg, WikiAnswer page says that it originated in Ireland, and that too because of a mere accident.

Scrambled egg, though a very easy-to-cook preparation, has different versions spread throughout the world. In India,  there are at least two styles – the Parsi style called Akoori and Anda bhurji in Punjab.

In Europe and America scrambled egg is prepared whisking milk and egg together with little salt and frying it in butter till the eggs coagulate. Though the basic ingredient, egg remains the same while the other constituents (herbs and spices) vary with geography. Parsis add cumin, mint, ginger, garlic and many other herbs to their most popular traditional dish, Akoori, while in Nigerian cuisine the scrambled egg is made with thyme, green pepper and fried in ground nut oil.

The one I prepared was a simple one with little amount of herbs and spices in it. You can prepare this sumptuous breakfast with herbed cheese spread over brown bread and the smoking scrambled egg.

Preparation time: 5mins

Cooking time: 5mins

Serves: 2

Ingredients:

  • Eggs (Dim): 4
  • Onion (Peyaj): 1 large, coarsely chopped
  • Tomato: 1 medium size, chopped
  • Cilantro (Dhane pata): A small bunch, coarsely chopped
  • Green chili (Kacha lanka): 2, chopped
  • Turmeric powder (Halud guro): ½ teaspoon
  • Sunflower oil (Sada tel): 1 tablespoon
  • Salt to taste

Preparation:

  • Break the eggs in a large bowl along with the turmeric powder and salt, whisk and keep aside
  • Heat oil in a shallow pan, throw in the chopped onions and sauté for a few minutes till soft
  • Add the cilantro, tomatoes and green chilies and fry till the oil separates
  • Pour in the whisked egg and stir continuously till it dries up sufficiently
  • Take out from flame and serve hot with bread toast

Hot Tips: To make the breakfast heavy you can add minced meat, bacon, cottage cheese and/or shredded cheese, or anything you like.

Further Reading – Scrambled egg with Cavier, Anda Bhruji, Akoori Masala Dosa

Do you know of any other version of Scrambled Eggs?

Sending this Weekend Herb Blogging, hosted by Lynne of Cafe Lynnlu and to NTTC#5 event hosted by Sneh of Gel’s Kitchen.

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French Toast

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“An Egg today is better than a Hen tomorrow.”
Benjamin Franklin (1706-1790)

Yesterday, we started the series Breakfast with Eggs Recipes. Today, we’ll present French Toast (Part 1 was Mughlai Paratha).

French toast is a very popular breakfast in the Western world, but with globalization, French toast has become a part of our cuisine too, albeit with some variations. A little research on the web revealed some interesting facts about the dish.

The French toast made in Europe and America contains milk along with eggs as one of the main ingredients for soaking the bread slices. They even use cinnamon, granulated sugar as addendum, and have it with Maple or any other syrup. Here’s a googly – French toast isn’t necessarily of French origin. It finds its earliest mention in a 4th century Roman cookbook – Apicius. Frying the day old stale bread solved the problem for unappetizing crunchy bread. The book, apparently, is arranged in a manner similar to modern cookbooks.

French Toast

French Toast

Preparation time: 5 mins

Cooking time: 5 mins

Serves: 2

Ingredients:

  • Milk bread (Pauruti): 4-6 slices
  • Eggs (Dim): 3
  • Onion (Peyaj): 1 medium size, chopped into small pieces
  • Green chili (Kacha Lanka): 2, finely chopped
  • Sunflower oil (Sada tel) for frying
  • Salt to taste

Preparation:

  • Cut the bread slices diagonally and keep aside
  • Break the eggs into a wide, shallow plate along with chopped onion, chilies and salt, beat well with a fork
  • Place the bread slices , one at a time, letting the egg to soak in, turn the slices around to soak the other side also
  • Heat oil in a pan and fry the egg soaked slices till golden brown on both sides
  • Serve hot with tomato sauce or green chutney

Hot tip: To reduce the calorie intake, you can use brown bread instead of milk bread.

Further reading – French toast, Wiki, Cheftalk, Baked French toast

French toast on way to NTTC#5 event hosted by Sneh of Gel’s Kitchen.

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Mughlai Paratha

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“We plan, we toil, we suffer – in the hope of what?  A camel-load of idol’s eyes?  The title deeds of Radio City?  The empire of Asia?  A trip to the moon?  No, no, no, no.  Simply to wake just in time to smell coffee and bacon and eggs.”

~J.B. Priestly

The wikipedia defines an egg is a round or oval body laid by the female of any number of different species, consisting of an ovum surrounded by layers of membranes and an outer casing, which acts to nourish and protect a developing embryo and its nutrient reserves. Most edible eggs, including bird eggs and turtle eggs, consist of a protective, oval eggshell, the albumen (egg white), the vitellus (egg yolk), and various thin membranes. Every part is edible, although the eggshell is generally discarded. Nutritionally, eggs are considered a good source of protein and choline.

In an (Egg) shell

In an (Egg) shell

Well, that’s hardly why we eat Eggs though. Simply put, we eat eggs because we love ‘em. Eggs taste good, are a great source of protein (and amino acids) and most of all, are easy to cook. Traditionally, Bengalis (or for that matter, Indians) didn’t have non vegetarian breakfast. With times, food habits have changed too. Boiled eggs, bread omlette, scrambled/poached eggs are a routine these days.

Starting today, this blog will feature egg recipes for breakfast. These easy 15 (or max 20) minutes easy to cook recipes will help folks who stay alone (office goers/students) and mommies who have a hard time finding that illusive nutritional, easy-to-cook, and tasty breakfast for their kids. We’ll present dishes where egg is present but isn’t necessarily the main ingredient. We start with Mughlai Paratha today.

Mughlai Paratha, as the name suggests, should have dated back from the Mogul (Mughal) days, though we couldn’t find its history in the web. The filling can be of many things, keema (minced meat), potato etc along with other ingredients.

Preparation time: 10 mins

Cooking time: 12mins

Serves: 4

Ingredients:

Refined flour (Maida): 1 cup

Eggs (Dim): 2

Grated coconut (Narkel korano): ½ cup

Onion (Peyaj): 1 medium, finely chopped

Ginger Garlic paste (Ada rasun bata): 1 tablespoon

Green chili (Kacha lanka): 2, chopped

Sunflower oil (Sada tel) to fry

Salt to taste

Mughlai Paratha Preparation

Mughlai Paratha Preparation

Preparation:

  • Sift the flour , add ½ teaspoon of salt to it, pour half-cup of water and knead into a soft dough, use more water or fry flour to make the dough non-sticky
  • Divide the dough into four equal portions and shape into balls, keep aside
  • For the filling, beat the egg in a bowl, add the crushed coconut , ginger garlic paste, chopped onion, green chilies and salt; mix well
  • Roll out each ball of dough into a 8 inch diameter paratha and place one-fourth of the filling at the centre of the paratha
  • Wrap the filling carefully from all sides to make a square
  • Heat one tablespoon of oil in a pan and place the paratha carefully in it without letting the filling come out
  • Fry well till both the sides become golden brown, use extra oil if required
  • Similarly make the other three parathas and serve hot with tomato sauce and potato curry (optional)
Mughlai Paratha Ready

Mughlai Paratha Ready

Further Reading – Peter Cherches, Wiki How, Mughlai Cuisine

Mughlai Paratha goes to  NTTC#5 event hosted by Sneh of Gel’s Kitchen.

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Welcome to Our New Site

Welcome to our new website. This website is about: the love for Bengali food. Learning how to cook Bengali dishes with the age old spices. Here, you will find everything about Bengali cuisine and how to be a master in the art.

Inviting smiles

Inviting smiles

Why a blog on Bengali cuisine?

One Answer – because we had a hard time finding a real good food blog focused on Bengali recipes and Sudeshna churned out regular Bengali recipes at her blog (which clocks > 7500 pageviews a month), so this attempt.

Another Answer – 230 million (source Wikipedia) Bongs are spread over India, Bangladesh, US, UK etc. Over decades, Bengali food (both sweets and dishes) have earned reputation in India and elsewhere, yet renowned voices of Bengali food in English are too few (Rinki BhattacharyaSutapa). Of late, however, there has been sudden growth of Restaurants serving Bengali food. Bangalore has 10+ quality Bengali restaurants now.

There are millions of Bengalis spread around the globe, who just want to taste mom’s alu posto or the chatni at the end of the afternoon meal. But most of us are not aware of the right ingredients or when to use them. This blog will help you through the preparations and so that your kitchen can also smell of the one back home. We dedicate this blog to all those who love aroma and taste of Bengali food.

What more? Our blog will also have some recipes from the other cuisines from India and other parts of the world.This blog aims to become one stop shop to master the art of bengali cuisine. There are at present 80 different recipes to choose from, which we had imported from our previous wordpres.com blog. Pick one, cook (or ask your cook to cook) and let us know how it fared.

If your taste buds are yet to encounter Bengali dishes, there is a lot for you to benefit from here. If you are a seasoned cook, I would appreciate if you could give your valuable comments on the posts. So sit back and enjoy the delicious recipes from all over Bengal.

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